Orthopedic Issues Series: Degenerative Disc Disease – Part 2

In Part 1 of this post, we discussed the anatomy of the spine and some of the causes of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD).   In Part 2 of this post, we will be discussing some of the symptoms of DDD, and some of the methods used to treat DDD.


Not all people with intervertebral disc degeneration experience pain or other symptoms.  This is due to the fact that the degeneration of the discs, by itself, does not bring on the symptoms described in the first paragraph above.  However, as disc degeneration becomes more severe, it can lead to other conditions that bring on the symptoms people normally associate with DDD (e.g., pain, numbness and tingling, weakness, etc.).  Some of the conditions commonly associated with DDD are:

  • Spinal osteoarthritis:  Sometimes referred to as spondylosis, this condition occurs when the breakdown of the cartilage and intervertebral discs leads to increased contact and irritation of the vertebrae.  It may also lead to the formation of osteophytes (abnormal bone growths) on the vertebrae that can also put pressure on nerves and contribute to the pain and nerve-related issues described above.
  • Spinal stenosis:  This condition can occur when an individual develops spondylosis. The inflammation associated with spinal osteoarthritis may cause a narrowing of the spinal canal (the hollow space in the middle of the vertebrae through which the spinal cord travels) and put pressure on the spinal cord.  This pressure on the spinal cord can cause numbness, weakness, cramping, or general pain in the arms and legs.  In some cases it can also cause bowel and bladder dysfunction.
  • Foraminal stenosis:  This condition is the result of reduced space between the vertebrae, often brought on by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs.  The reduced space may lead to increased pressure on nerve roots emerging from the spinal cord, resulting in localized pain as well as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the extremities.


Because DDD can cause such a broad range of symptoms and subsequent conditions, the treatment options vary widely.  Depending on the circumstances, treatment can range from conservative options, such as physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications, to surgical intervention, in the form of a discectomy, laminectomy, laminoplasty, or spinal fusion.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, the best course of action is to consult a physician.

For more information on how disability insurers evaluate claims based on Degenerative Disc Disease, see:

A Stiff Upper Lip Can Lead to Getting Stiffed by Your Insurer

Disability Insurance: Who Gets Denied?

Myelopathy: Part 1

Myelopathy: Part 2