Tag Archives: back pain

Chronic Pain and Anxiety Disorders

Chronic pain by itself is often debilitating, and the struggle to obtain a correct diagnosis, effective pain management, and ongoing treatment can be stressful and overwhelming.  As we discussed in a previous post, depression often co-occurs with chronic pain, and can further complicate treatment.  The same is true of anxiety disorders.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Anxiety

Like depression, anxiety is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

It is no secret that physicians and dentists have stressful and demanding careers.  One Cardiff University study showed that of 2,000 British doctors, at various stages of their careers, 60% had experienced mental illness.[1]  Often practitioners ignore or fight through both chronic pain and anxiety and show up to work, to the point of endangering themselves or others before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.

While anxiety alone can result in an inability to practice, either indefinitely or in the short-term, it is also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain to experience an anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are also the most common type of psychiatric disorders in the United States, with 19 million adults affected.[2]

Chronic Pain and Anxiety—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can be anxiety provoking for a physician, who must (1) face giving up a career he or she invested so much time and financial resources to establish; (2) seek a correct diagnosis, course of treatment, and adequate pain management; and (3) often struggle with adapting to the loss of a previously enjoyed quality of life.  Conversely, chronic pain is also common in people with anxiety disorders,[3]  with up to 70% of people with certain medical conditions (including hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis) had an anxiety disorder first.[4]

Regardless of whether anxiety or chronic pain came first, individuals suffering from anxiety can experience pain that is particularly intense and hard to treat.[5]  In a 2013 study, 45% of 250 patients who had moderate to severe chronic joint or back pain screened positive for at least one of the common anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety, social anxiety, PTSD, OCD).  Further, those that had an anxiety disorder reported significantly worse pain and health-related quality of life than their counterparts without anxiety.[6]

Symptoms of Anxiety[7]

There are several anxiety disorders and, while the below list is by no means exhaustive, sufferers of anxiety often exhibit the following symptoms:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness, feeling wound-up or on edge, irritability, muscle tension
  • Being easily fatigued and problems with sleep
  • Difficulty concentrating or having their minds go blank

Panic Disorder

  • Sudden and repeated attacks of intense fear
  • Feelings of being out of control during a panic attack
  • Intense worries about when the next attack will happen
  • Avoidance of places where panic attacks have occurred in the past

Social Anxiety Disorder

  • Feeling highly anxious about being around other people (including having a hard time talking to them, blushing, sweating, trembling, or feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Feeling self-conscious in front of others and worried about feeling humiliated, embarrassed or rejected, or fearful of offending others
  • Worrying before an event and/or avoiding places where there are other people
  • Having a hard time making and keeping friends

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Flashbacks, bad dreams, difficulty sleeping, frightening thoughts, angry outbursts
  • Avoiding places, events, objects, thoughts, or feelings that are reminders of the traumatic experience and trouble remembering key features of the traumatic event
  • Being easily startled and feeling tense or “on edge”
  • Negative feelings about oneself or the world, and distorted feelings like guilt or blame
  • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • Fear of germs or contamination
  • Unwanted or forbidden thoughts, including aggressive thoughts towards others or self
  • Having things symmetrical or in perfect order; excessive clearing and/or hand washing; ordering and arranging things in a precise way; repeatedly checking on things; compulsive counting

Treatments for Anxiety

Some of the treatments that have been successful in addressing anxiety in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Support groups
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

[1] Michael Brooks, Why doctors’ mental health should be a concern for us all, NewStatesmen, April 11, 2016, http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2016/04/why-doctors-mental-health-should-be-concern-us-all

[2] What are Anxiety Disorders?, Global Medical Education, https://www.gmeded.com/gme-info-graphics/what-are-anxiety-disorders

[3] Chronic Pain, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, April, 2016, https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain

[4] Global Medical Education, Supra.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection

[6] Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, Chronic pain sufferers likely to have anxiety, ScienceDaily, May 8, 2013, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130508213112.htm

[7] Definitions according to National Institute of Mental Health: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml

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Chronic Pain and Depression

Chronic pain is often difficult to diagnose and treat.  Consequently, those who suffer from chronic pain typically must also deal with a significant amount of stress, due to repeated failed treatments, numerous medical appointments, interruption of work and enjoyable activities, and the inability of their friends or family to understand their physical limitations.  This can, in turn, cause or worsen depression.  When depression occurs alongside chronic pain, it can make dealing with and treating the pain even harder.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Depression

While mental health conditions, including depression, can often be disabling in and of themselves, they are unfortunately also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain.  Depression is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Joint Pain
  • Arthritis
  • Migraines
  • Fibromyalgia

Studies show that rates of depression are high in residents and medical students (15%-30%) than rates in the general population, and the risk of depression continues throughout a physician’s career.[1]  According to a British study, 60% of dentists reported being anxious, tense, or depressed.

Dentists, doctors, and other medical professionals place extreme amounts of pressure on themselves because the stakes of their professions are so high.  In addition to perfectionism and self-criticism, other predictors of depression in doctors include:  lack of sleep, stressful interactions with patients and staff, dealing with death, constant responsibility, loneliness, and making mistakes.[2]

Often practitioners work through both chronic pain and psychiatric disorders for some time before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.  In the case of depression, this can be due in part to the social stigma that surrounds it.  For all of these reasons, depression may go undiagnosed or seem less of an immediate concern to those suffering from chronic pain.  However, if you are experiencing symptoms of depression and chronic pain, studies show that it is important to treat both, because chronic pain can become much more difficulty to treat if the depression is allowed to progress unchecked.

Chronic Pain and Depression—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can trigger depression—this is especially understandable for doctors or dentists who have put years into medical school and establishing their careers, only to become disabled and have to step away from a profession that has become a significant part of their identity. Depression can also precede chronic pain.  For example, several studies have examined the link between depression before the onset of back-pain.[3]

Regardless of which came first, together they are formidable to treat.  Major depression is thought to be four times greater in people with chronic back pain than those in the general population, and studies show that individuals suffering from both chronic back pain and depression experienced a greater degree of impairment than those with either depression or back pain alone.[4]

Treatments for Depression

Focusing solely on pain management can prevent both the patient’s and treating physician’s ability to recognize that a psychiatric disorder is also present.  Yet, even with correct diagnoses, both issues can be difficult to treat together.[5]  For instance, those who suffer from both chronic pain and mental illnesses can have a lower pain threshold as well as increased sensitivity to medication side-effects.[6]  Some treatments that have proved successful in addressing depression in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Acupuncture
  • Hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Symptoms of Depression

  • Little interest or pleasure in doing things
  • Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless
  • Trouble falling asleep or sleeping too much
  • Feeling tired or having little energy
  • Poor appetite or overeating
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Feeling bad about yourself, or that you are a failure or have let yourself or others down
  • Thoughts that you would be better off dead, or hurting yourself in some way

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

_________________________________________________________________________

[1] Robert P. Bright, MD, Depression and suicide among physicians, Current Psychiatry, April 10, 2011.

[2] Id.

[3] William W. Deardorff, PHD, ABPP, Depression Can Lead to Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-can-lead-chronic-back-pain.

[4] William W. Deardorff, PhD, ABPP, Depression and Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-and-chronic-back-pain.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection.

[6] Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Chronic Pain,  https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain.

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fMRI Brain Scanning: The Future of Proving Pain?

Many disability claimants suffering from chronic, intense pain are surprised and disheartened when their reported pain levels are received with skepticism by their insurance company.  Since pain is a subjective feeling, treating doctors typically ask patients to self-report their pain on a scale of 0-10, so that they can diagnose and treat the pain.  Unfortunately, most insurance companies are unwilling to accept self-reported pain levels and will often try to downplay the severity of the claimant’s pain, citing a lack of objective evidence.

Recently, researchers have developed a technology called functional MRI scans, or fMRIs, for short, which may provide a new way to objectively verify the existence of pain.  In this post, we will examine this technology and discuss how it might be used in the context of disability claims.

I.  What is an fMRI?

fMRI scanning is a noninvasive technique used by doctors to map and measure brain activity.  More specifically, fMRIs are used to measure and observe increases in MR signal caused by neural activity in the brain.  The fMRI data is then analyzed to determine which parts of the brain were active during the scan.  The data is then compared to known neurological signatures, or “biomarkers,” to determine if there are any correlations between the neural activity in the brain and the symptoms reported by the patient (such as chronic pain).

II. The Use of fMRI Scans to Prove Pain

Recently, a number of companies and researchers are focusing on using fMRI scans to produce objective evidence of pain.  For instance, Dr. Joy Hirsch, a professor at the Yale School of Medicine, claims to have developed a test that is capable of distinguishing real, chronic pain from imagined pain.

fMRI scans are also now being used to support the cases of claimants in disability cases. For example, a woman in New York recently used an fMRI scan to convince her insurer, after two years of litigation, that her disability claim never should have been denied.  An fMRI scan was also recently used in the case of Carl Koch, a truck driver from Arizona who suffered severe burns when the hose of his tanker broke loose and sprayed him with molten tar.  Mr. Koch visited Dr. Hirsch, who used functional brain mapping to conclude that Mr. Koch’s pain was real.  When the judge ruled that Dr. Hirsch’s testimony would be admissible at trial, the case settled for $800,000 – an amount ten times higher than the company’s original offer.

III. What the Skeptics Say

The use of fMRI scans to prove pain remains controversial. Some critics argue that the techniques being used in litigation have little support in existing publications.  Others, such as Tor Wager, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at UC Boulder, contend that the sample size in available studies is too small.  Proponents of fMRI refute both of these claims, arguing that a number of credible studies support the validity of their methods.

IV. The Future of fMRI Scans in Disability Cases

It’s easy to see how fMRI scans could prove useful in a disability claim.  For example, many dentists suffer from musculoskeletal disorders, particularly in their spines, that cause chronic, debilitating pain.  However, as noted above, these types of claims can be particularly difficult, because many insurance companies refuse to accept a claimant’s self-reported pain levels and limitations.  Co-workers, family, and friends can provide statements describing how the dentist’s pain is affecting his performance at work and his quality of life, but once again, insurance companies will typically similarly claim that such statements are “objectively verifiable” evidence of the pain.  Sometimes a cervical or lumbar MRI can identify potential causes for the pain, and/or a functional capacity exam (FCE) can help document the limitations the pain is causing—but these types of reports are also commonly challenged by insurance companies intent on denying benefits.

In such a case, an fMRI scan illustrating the doctor’s pain might serve as an additional, objectively verifiable method of establishing the existence of chronic pain.  Whether or not insurance companies are willing to accept fMRIs as reliable evidence of pain remains to be seen, and will likely depend, in large part, on how willing courts are to accept fMRIs as admissible evidence of pain.  If, in the future, this technology continues to develop and become more precise, and courts and juries demonstrate a willingness to accept fMRIs as proof of pain, fMRIs may eventually be enough to convince insurance companies to accept legitimate disability claims without ever setting foot in a courtroom.

REFERENCES:

  1. UC San Diego Sch. of Med., What is fMRI?, available at http://fmri.ucsd.edu/Research/whatisfmri.html.
  1. Sushrut Jangi, Measuring Pain Using Functional MRI, The New England Journal of Medicine, available at http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/9863/2013/04/10/.
  1. Steven Levy, Brain Imaging of Pain Brings Success to Disability Claim, EIN Presswire (June 29, 2016), available at http://www.einpresswire.com/article/333249721/brain-imaging-of-pain-brings-success-to-disability-claim.
  1. Kevin Davis, Personal Injury Lawyers Turn to Neuroscience to Back Claims of Chronic Pain, ABA Journal (Mar. 1, 2016), available at http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/personal_injury_lawyers_turn_to_neuroscience_to_back_claims_of_chronic_pain.
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Long Term Disability by Diagnosis

In previous posts, we have been looking at the findings from the most recent study on long term disability claims conducted by the Council for Disability Awareness.  In this post we will be looking at the types of diagnoses associated with long term disability claims, and which types of claims are most common.

CDA Graph - Diagnosis

As you can see from the chart above, the most common type of both new and existing long term disability is musculoskeletal disorders—a category which includes neck and back pain caused by degenerative disc disease and similar spine and joint disorders.

This is particularly noteworthy because physicians and dentists, who often have to maintain uncomfortable static postures for several hours each day, are very susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders.  In addition, claims involving musculoskeletal disorders can be challenging, because oftentimes there is little objective evidence to verify the pain.  If you suffer from degenerative disc disease or a similar disorder, an experienced disability attorney can explain how to properly document your claim to the insurance company.

References:

http://www.disabilitycanhappen.org/research/CDA_LTD_Claims_Survey_2014.asp

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Myelopathy: Part 2

In Part 1 of this post, we listed some of the symptoms and potential causes of myelopathy.  In Part 2, we will discuss some of the methods used to treat myelopathy.

Methods of Treating Myelopathy

  • Avoidance of activities that cause pain;
  • Acupuncture;
  • Using a brace to immobilize the neck;
  • Physical therapy (primarily exercises to improve neck strength and flexibility);
  • Various medication (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), oral corticosteroids, muscle relaxants, anti-seizure medications, antidepressants, and prescription pain relievers);
  • Epidural steroid injections (ESI);
  • Narcotics, if pain is very severe;
  • Surgical removal of bone spurs/herniated discs putting pressure on spinal cord;
  • Surgical removal of portions of vertebrae in spine (to give the spinal cord more room); and
  • Spinal fusion surgery.

Conclusion

Myelopathy can be severely debilitating, particularly for doctors and dentists. Obviously, any physician or dentist who is experiencing a loss of motor skills, numbness in hands and arms and/or high levels of chronic pain will not be able to effectively treat patients.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may want to ask your doctor to conduct tests to see if your spinal cord is being compressed. If you have myelopathy and the pain and numbness has progressed to the point where you can no longer treat patients effectively or safely, you should stop treating patients and consider filing a disability claim.

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Myelopathy: Part 1

In previous posts, we have discussed a number of disabling conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, essential tremors, carpal tunnel syndrome, and fibromyalgia. In this post, we are going to talk about another serious condition that can severely limit a physician or dentist’s ability to practice—myelopathy. In Part 1, we will discuss some of the causes and symptoms of myelopathy. In Part 2, we will discuss some of the methods used to treat myelopathy.

What is Myelopathy?

Myelopathy is an overarching term used to describe any neurologic deficit caused by compression of the spinal cord.

The onset of myelopathy can be rapid or it can develop slowly over a period of months. In most cases, myelopathy is progressive; however, the timing and progression of symptoms varies significantly from person to person.

What Causes Myelopathy?

There are several potential causes of myelopathy, including:

  • Bone fractures or dislocations due to trauma/injury;
  • Inflammatory diseases/autoimmune disorders (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis);
  • Structural abnormalities (e.g. bone spurs, disc bulges, herniated discs, thickened ligaments);
  • Vascular problems;
  • Tumors;
  • Infections; and
  • Degenerative changes due to aging.

Symptoms of Myelopathy

The symptoms of myelopathy will vary from case to case, because the nature and severity of the symptoms will depend on which level of the spine is being compressed—i.e. cervical (neck), thoracic (middle), or lumbar (lower)—and the extent of the compression.

Some of the symptoms of myelopathy include:

  • Neck stiffness;
  • Deep aching pain in one or both sides of neck, and possibly arms and shoulders;
  • Grating or crackling sensation when moving neck;
  • Stabbing pain in arm, elbow, wrist or arms;
  • Dull ache/tingling/numbness/weakness in arms, hands, legs or feet;
  • Position sense loss (i.e. the inability to know where your arms are without looking at them);
  • Deterioration of fine motor skills (such as handwriting and the ability to button shirts);
  • Lack of coordination, imbalance, heavy feeling in the legs, and difficulty walking;
  • Clumsiness of hands and trouble grasping;
  • Intermittent shooting pains in arms and legs (especially when bending head forward);
  • Incontinence; and
  • Paralysis (in extreme cases).
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Will Physical Therapy Help Your Back Pain?

In previous posts, we have discussed some of the methods used to treat back pain. One common method of treatment is physical therapy. However, according to a recent study published in JAMA, physical therapy may not provide significant benefits for patients suffering from lower back pain.

The JAMA study divided patients with back pain into two groups. The first group participated in sessions with a physical therapist. The second group was simply told that the pain would get better if they maintained an active lifestyle.

Although the physical therapy group demonstrated more improvement over the first 3 months (based on a scale that measures disability from lower back pain), after 1 year both groups’ results were substantially the same.

Additionally, the study did not find any meaningful differences in the groups’ pain intensity, quality of life, or number of visits to health care providers.

Thus, the study would seem to suggest that while physical therapy may help for a limited amount of time, in the long run it may not necessarily be an effective treatment method for back pain.

Notably, the sample size for the study was small (207 people), so further research may be necessary to more precisely determine the extent of the benefits provided by physical therapy.

See also http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/14/physical-therapy-may-not-benefit-back-pain/?smid=tw-nytimeswell&smtyp=cur&_r=0.

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Posture and Your Practice

Good posture is important for everyone, but especially for dentists, who spend a fair amount of time in static positions, making repetitive movements, or bending or twisting in ways that aren’t necessarily natural for human bodies. Today, we’re going to give you some tips on how to improve your posture and positioning in your everyday life as well as your practice, so that you may potentially avoid or delay future disabling pain.

General Posture

  • Keep your body in alignment.
    • While standing, this means distributing your weight evenly on both feet, and making sure that you keep your weight from shifting either forward on the balls of your feet or backward on your heels.
    • When seated, sit up straight and keep your ears, shoulders, and hips in a straight line. A good trick is to picture a balloon attached to the top of your head, pulling you upward.
  • Move around a bit.
    • When your muscles get tired, it’s much easier to slouch or fall into a position that might be comfortable now, but could strain parts of your body you don’t want strained. It’s important to walk around after every half-hour or so of sitting to stretch and refresh your body.
    • Also, moving around slightly while seated is a good way to refresh your muscles. Instead of making your back tight by forcing a constantly straight position, bend a little bit every now and then to reset your posture, and give yourself a break.
  • When working at a desk, use a chair that has good lumbar support or use a small pillow placed between your back and the chair.
    • The spine naturally curves in an “S” shape, so it is important to support your lower back. Ergonomically designed chairs can do this. Using a small pillow for your lower back can also help support your spine.
    • It is also important to sit back in your chair and not on the edge of the seat. A chair is able to provide a solid foundation for your seat only if you use all of the area.
  • Make sure your desk chair is properly aligned to your workspace.
    • Keep your feet flat on the floor and have your hips slightly higher than your knees when sitting at a desk. This will keep you from adding strain to your hip flexor muscles, which play a role in lower back stability.

In the Dental Chair

  • Keep your patient at waist level.
    • This enables you to maintain your proper posture and work safely within your patient’s mouth. It also helps keep your wrists straight, and elbows at 90 degrees, which puts less strain on your arms, shoulders and back.
    • To test it out, hold a 5–pound weight away from your body at waist–height and slowly move it in until your elbows are at 90 degrees. Notice how the weight is much more comfortable to hold when it is closer to your body.
  • Have your tools easily available.
    • Keep everything you may need within a short reach and in front of you so you don’t do any unnecessary twisting, bending or turning.
  • Have better designed tools.
    • You can get lighter tools and angled hand-pieces that allow you to better reach difficult places in your patient’s mouth. It would also be helpful to replace old hoses with ones that are designed to be lighter and straight, so you don’t have to fight the tension of a coil.
    • Gloves are also important: using ambidextrous gloves forces your thumb into an unnatural position and constrains your fingers into one plane, which isn’t anatomically correct. Look into purchasing gloves specifically for your left and right hands to avoid this strain.

While all of these tips can be helpful in preventing future pain, none of them are a cure-all for potential disabilities, and they may not “fix” pain that has already begun. It is essential to have a dialogue with your doctor about any issues that you may be having. It may also be useful to talk to a disability insurance lawyer if you think that your current or future pain may not allow you to continue practicing. We hope that these tips were helpful; let us know in the comments what worked for you!

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