Tag Archives: disabled doctor

Chronic Pain and Anxiety Disorders

Chronic pain by itself is often debilitating, and the struggle to obtain a correct diagnosis, effective pain management, and ongoing treatment can be stressful and overwhelming.  As we discussed in a previous post, depression often co-occurs with chronic pain, and can further complicate treatment.  The same is true of anxiety disorders.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Anxiety

Like depression, anxiety is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

It is no secret that physicians and dentists have stressful and demanding careers.  One Cardiff University study showed that of 2,000 British doctors, at various stages of their careers, 60% had experienced mental illness.[1]  Often practitioners ignore or fight through both chronic pain and anxiety and show up to work, to the point of endangering themselves or others before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.

While anxiety alone can result in an inability to practice, either indefinitely or in the short-term, it is also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain to experience an anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are also the most common type of psychiatric disorders in the United States, with 19 million adults affected.[2]

Chronic Pain and Anxiety—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can be anxiety provoking for a physician, who must (1) face giving up a career he or she invested so much time and financial resources to establish; (2) seek a correct diagnosis, course of treatment, and adequate pain management; and (3) often struggle with adapting to the loss of a previously enjoyed quality of life.  Conversely, chronic pain is also common in people with anxiety disorders,[3]  with up to 70% of people with certain medical conditions (including hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis) had an anxiety disorder first.[4]

Regardless of whether anxiety or chronic pain came first, individuals suffering from anxiety can experience pain that is particularly intense and hard to treat.[5]  In a 2013 study, 45% of 250 patients who had moderate to severe chronic joint or back pain screened positive for at least one of the common anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety, social anxiety, PTSD, OCD).  Further, those that had an anxiety disorder reported significantly worse pain and health-related quality of life than their counterparts without anxiety.[6]

Symptoms of Anxiety[7]

There are several anxiety disorders and, while the below list is by no means exhaustive, sufferers of anxiety often exhibit the following symptoms:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness, feeling wound-up or on edge, irritability, muscle tension
  • Being easily fatigued and problems with sleep
  • Difficulty concentrating or having their minds go blank

Panic Disorder

  • Sudden and repeated attacks of intense fear
  • Feelings of being out of control during a panic attack
  • Intense worries about when the next attack will happen
  • Avoidance of places where panic attacks have occurred in the past

Social Anxiety Disorder

  • Feeling highly anxious about being around other people (including having a hard time talking to them, blushing, sweating, trembling, or feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Feeling self-conscious in front of others and worried about feeling humiliated, embarrassed or rejected, or fearful of offending others
  • Worrying before an event and/or avoiding places where there are other people
  • Having a hard time making and keeping friends

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Flashbacks, bad dreams, difficulty sleeping, frightening thoughts, angry outbursts
  • Avoiding places, events, objects, thoughts, or feelings that are reminders of the traumatic experience and trouble remembering key features of the traumatic event
  • Being easily startled and feeling tense or “on edge”
  • Negative feelings about oneself or the world, and distorted feelings like guilt or blame
  • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • Fear of germs or contamination
  • Unwanted or forbidden thoughts, including aggressive thoughts towards others or self
  • Having things symmetrical or in perfect order; excessive clearing and/or hand washing; ordering and arranging things in a precise way; repeatedly checking on things; compulsive counting

Treatments for Anxiety

Some of the treatments that have been successful in addressing anxiety in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Support groups
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

[1] Michael Brooks, Why doctors’ mental health should be a concern for us all, NewStatesmen, April 11, 2016, http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2016/04/why-doctors-mental-health-should-be-concern-us-all

[2] What are Anxiety Disorders?, Global Medical Education, https://www.gmeded.com/gme-info-graphics/what-are-anxiety-disorders

[3] Chronic Pain, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, April, 2016, https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain

[4] Global Medical Education, Supra.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection

[6] Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, Chronic pain sufferers likely to have anxiety, ScienceDaily, May 8, 2013, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130508213112.htm

[7] Definitions according to National Institute of Mental Health: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml

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I used to practice __________ but now I’m _____________?

 

You spent years in school and invested countless hours to establish and maintain your practice.  You even protected this investment by purchasing a disability policy.  Yet, if you do become disabled and make a claim, your insurer might still make the argument that you are only trying to retire and get paid for it.  Unfortunately, disability insurance claims by doctors and other healthcare professionals are especially targeted for denial or termination.

When you are disabled and are no longer able to practice in your profession, it may seem logical to simply refer to yourself as “retired,” especially if you are not working in another capacity.  While it’s certainly understandable that you may not want to explain to everyone who asks why you’ve hung up your lab coat, you need to keep in mind that innocently referring to yourself as retired will likely prompt your insurer to subject your claim to higher scrutiny.  Insurance companies often attempt to take statements out of context in order to deny or terminate benefits by alleging that a legitimately disabled claimant is:

  • Malingering
  • Making a lifestyle choice.
  • Unmotivated by or unsatisfied with work.
  • Embracing the sick role.

Remember, in the insurance company’s mind, there is a big difference between “disabled” and “retired.” Below are some common situations where you should avoid referring to yourself as retired:

  • When asked for your profession on claim forms.
  • When talking to your doctors or filling out medical paperwork.
  • On your taxes, other financial forms, and applications.
  • Around the office.
  • At social functions or gatherings.
  • On social media.

Insurers can—and often do—employ private investigators to follow claimants on social media; interview staff, family, or acquaintances; and track down “paper trail” documents (such as professional license renewal forms, loan applications, etc.) to see if you have made any statements that could be construed as inconsistent with your disability claim.  Insurers also routinely request medical records and may even contact your doctor(s) directly regarding your disability.  So, for example, saying something off-hand or even jokingly, such as “I’m retired—I can stay out as late as I want now!” to your doctor, or at a social event like a block party, could lead to your insurer trying to deny your claim if they later spoke to your doctor or your neighbor.

While the focus of your claim should be on your condition and how it prevents you from working, insurance companies can latch on to innocent statements like this in an effort to deny legitimate claims. Eschewing the word “retirement” is a good and easy first step to help avoid unwanted and unwarranted scrutiny from insurers.

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Chronic Pain and Depression

Chronic pain is often difficult to diagnose and treat.  Consequently, those who suffer from chronic pain typically must also deal with a significant amount of stress, due to repeated failed treatments, numerous medical appointments, interruption of work and enjoyable activities, and the inability of their friends or family to understand their physical limitations.  This can, in turn, cause or worsen depression.  When depression occurs alongside chronic pain, it can make dealing with and treating the pain even harder.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Depression

While mental health conditions, including depression, can often be disabling in and of themselves, they are unfortunately also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain.  Depression is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Joint Pain
  • Arthritis
  • Migraines
  • Fibromyalgia

Studies show that rates of depression are high in residents and medical students (15%-30%) than rates in the general population, and the risk of depression continues throughout a physician’s career.[1]  According to a British study, 60% of dentists reported being anxious, tense, or depressed.

Dentists, doctors, and other medical professionals place extreme amounts of pressure on themselves because the stakes of their professions are so high.  In addition to perfectionism and self-criticism, other predictors of depression in doctors include:  lack of sleep, stressful interactions with patients and staff, dealing with death, constant responsibility, loneliness, and making mistakes.[2]

Often practitioners work through both chronic pain and psychiatric disorders for some time before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.  In the case of depression, this can be due in part to the social stigma that surrounds it.  For all of these reasons, depression may go undiagnosed or seem less of an immediate concern to those suffering from chronic pain.  However, if you are experiencing symptoms of depression and chronic pain, studies show that it is important to treat both, because chronic pain can become much more difficulty to treat if the depression is allowed to progress unchecked.

Chronic Pain and Depression—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can trigger depression—this is especially understandable for doctors or dentists who have put years into medical school and establishing their careers, only to become disabled and have to step away from a profession that has become a significant part of their identity. Depression can also precede chronic pain.  For example, several studies have examined the link between depression before the onset of back-pain.[3]

Regardless of which came first, together they are formidable to treat.  Major depression is thought to be four times greater in people with chronic back pain than those in the general population, and studies show that individuals suffering from both chronic back pain and depression experienced a greater degree of impairment than those with either depression or back pain alone.[4]

Treatments for Depression

Focusing solely on pain management can prevent both the patient’s and treating physician’s ability to recognize that a psychiatric disorder is also present.  Yet, even with correct diagnoses, both issues can be difficult to treat together.[5]  For instance, those who suffer from both chronic pain and mental illnesses can have a lower pain threshold as well as increased sensitivity to medication side-effects.[6]  Some treatments that have proved successful in addressing depression in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Acupuncture
  • Hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Symptoms of Depression

  • Little interest or pleasure in doing things
  • Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless
  • Trouble falling asleep or sleeping too much
  • Feeling tired or having little energy
  • Poor appetite or overeating
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Feeling bad about yourself, or that you are a failure or have let yourself or others down
  • Thoughts that you would be better off dead, or hurting yourself in some way

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

_________________________________________________________________________

[1] Robert P. Bright, MD, Depression and suicide among physicians, Current Psychiatry, April 10, 2011.

[2] Id.

[3] William W. Deardorff, PHD, ABPP, Depression Can Lead to Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-can-lead-chronic-back-pain.

[4] William W. Deardorff, PhD, ABPP, Depression and Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-and-chronic-back-pain.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection.

[6] Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Chronic Pain,  https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain.

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Can Your Disability Insurance Company Dictate The Medical Treatment You Must Receive To Collect Benefits? Part 1

Imagine that you are a dentist suffering from cervical degenerative disc disease.  You can no longer perform clinical work without experiencing excruciating pain.  You have been going to physical therapy and taking muscle relaxers prescribed by your primary care doctor, and you feel that these conservative treatments are helping.  Like most dentists, you probably have an “own occupation” disability insurance policy.  You are certain that if you file your disability claim, your insurer will approve your claim and pay you the benefits you need to replace your lost income and cover the costs of the medical treatment that has provided you with relief from your pain and improved your quality of life.

You file your claim, submit the forms and paperwork requested by the insurer, and wait for a response.  To your dismay, your insurer informs you that its in-house physician has determined that the treatment prescribed by your doctor was inadequate.  Your insurer then tells you that you should have been receiving steroid injections into your cervical spine, and tells you that if you do not submit to this unwanted, invasive medical procedure, your claim could be denied under the “medical care” provision in your policy.

You were not aware that such a provision existed, but, sure enough, when you review your policy more carefully, you realize that there is a provision requiring you to receive “appropriate medical care” in order to collect disability benefits.  You think that your insurer is going too far by dictating what procedures you should or should not be receiving, but you are afraid that if you don’t comply with their demands, you will lose your disability benefits, which you desperately need.

This is precisely the sort of scenario presented to Richard Van Gemert, an oral surgeon who lost the vision in his left eye due to a cataract and chronic inflammation.  Dr. Van Gemert’s disability insurance policies required that he receive care by a physician which is “appropriate for the condition causing the disability.”  After years of resisting pressure from his insurers to undergo surgery, Dr. Van Gemert finally capitulated.  Once Dr. Van Gemert received the surgery, you might expect that his insurer would pay his claim without further complaint.  Instead, Dr. Van Gemert’s insurer promptly sued him to recover the years of benefits it had paid to him since it first asserted that he was required to undergo the surgery.[1]

Unfortunately, “appropriate care” provisions, like the provision in Dr. Van Gemert’s policy, are becoming more and more common.  The language in such provisions has also evolved over time, and not for the better.  In the 1980s and 1990s, the simple “regular care” standard was commonplace.  In the late 1990s and into the 2000s, insurers began using the more restrictive “appropriate care” standard.  And, if you were to purchase a policy today, you would find that many contain a very stringent “most appropriate care” standard.

These increasingly onerous standards have been carefully crafted to provide insurers with more leverage to dictate policyholders’ medical care. However, there are several reasons why your insurance company should not be the one making your medical decisions.  To begin, if you undergo a surgical procedure, it is you—and not the insurance company—who is bearing both the physical risk and the financial cost of the procedure.  Perhaps you have co-morbid conditions that would make an otherwise safe and routine surgical procedure extremely risky.  Perhaps there are multiple treatment options that are reasonable under the circumstances.  Perhaps you believe conservative treatment provides better relief for your condition than surgery would.  These are decisions that you have a right to make about your own body, regardless of what your insurer may be telling you.

In the remaining posts in this series, we will be looking at the different types of care provisions in more detail, and how far insurance companies can go in dictating your care in exchange for the payment of your disability benefits.  We will also provide you with useful information that you can use when choosing a policy or reviewing the policy you have in place. In the next post we will be discussing the “regular care” standard found in most policies issued in the 1980s and early 1990s.

[1] See Provident Life and Accident Insurance Co. v. Van Gemert, 262 F.Supp.2d 1047 (2003)

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Orthopedic Issues Series: Degenerative Disc Disease – Part 2

In Part 1 of this post, we discussed the anatomy of the spine and some of the causes of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD).   In Part 2 of this post, we will be discussing some of the symptoms of DDD, and some of the methods used to treat DDD.

Symptoms

Not all people with intervertebral disc degeneration experience pain or other symptoms.  This is due to the fact that the degeneration of the discs, by itself, does not bring on the symptoms described in the first paragraph above.  However, as disc degeneration becomes more severe, it can lead to other conditions that bring on the symptoms people normally associate with DDD (e.g., pain, numbness and tingling, weakness, etc.).  Some of the conditions commonly associated with DDD are:

  • Spinal osteoarthritis:  Sometimes referred to as spondylosis, this condition occurs when the breakdown of the cartilage and intervertebral discs leads to increased contact and irritation of the vertebrae.  It may also lead to the formation of osteophytes (abnormal bone growths) on the vertebrae that can also put pressure on nerves and contribute to the pain and nerve-related issues described above.
  • Spinal stenosis:  This condition can occur when an individual develops spondylosis. The inflammation associated with spinal osteoarthritis may cause a narrowing of the spinal canal (the hollow space in the middle of the vertebrae through which the spinal cord travels) and put pressure on the spinal cord.  This pressure on the spinal cord can cause numbness, weakness, cramping, or general pain in the arms and legs.  In some cases it can also cause bowel and bladder dysfunction.
  • Foraminal stenosis:  This condition is the result of reduced space between the vertebrae, often brought on by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs.  The reduced space may lead to increased pressure on nerve roots emerging from the spinal cord, resulting in localized pain as well as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the extremities.

Treatment:

Because DDD can cause such a broad range of symptoms and subsequent conditions, the treatment options vary widely.  Depending on the circumstances, treatment can range from conservative options, such as physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications, to surgical intervention, in the form of a discectomy, laminectomy, laminoplasty, or spinal fusion.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, the best course of action is to consult a physician.

For more information on how disability insurers evaluate claims based on Degenerative Disc Disease, see:

A Stiff Upper Lip Can Lead to Getting Stiffed by Your Insurer

Disability Insurance: Who Gets Denied?

Myelopathy: Part 1

Myelopathy: Part 2

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Orthopedic Issues Series: Degenerative Disc Disease – Part 1

This post is the first in a series we will be doing on common orthopedic issues.  In Part 1 of this post, we will discuss the anatomy of the spine and some of the causes of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD), a common yet misunderstood spinal condition that affects a large portion of the population.   In Part 2 of this post, we will go over some of the symptoms of DDD and some of the methods for treating DDD.

Anatomy

There are thirty-three vertebrae in the vertebral column of the human spine, twenty-four of which articulate and move.  Between each of the vertebrae in the three articulating sections of the spine – the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine – there is an intervertebral disc.  Each disc, composed of soft jelly-like center (nucleus pulposus) surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue (annulus fibrosis), provides shock absorption and flexibility within the spine.  There is very little blood flow to this region of the body, and if discs are damaged or deteriorate they cannot regrow or heal themselves.

Causes

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is the breakdown in the size and cushioning of the intervertebral discs, which can lead to chronic pain, weakness, numbness and tingling in extremities, and reduced flexibility in the spine. The name of the condition is actually somewhat of a misnomer – it is not actually a “disease”, but rather a condition that is characterized by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs over time. Because of this, the condition can be confusing to understand.

Reduction in the size and cushioning of your discs is part of the normal process of aging, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown that almost everyone over the age of 60 has degeneration of their intervertebral discs to some degree.[1]  Not all people with disc degeneration have back pain or other symptoms – in fact, individuals with relatively mild disc degeneration may experience no symptoms whatsoever.

However, age is not the only factor in DDD.  Deterioration of the intervertebral discs can be accelerated and exacerbated by other factors.  The culprit in many severe cases of DDD is stress-related damage in the form of repetitive use, trauma, injury, poor posture, poor movement, and obesity.  Among these, one of the most common factors is repetitive use.

Medical professionals are particularly susceptible to developing DDD due to the static postures that some specialties require in clinical practice, most notably dentists.  For example, the repetitive, static posture of a dentist performing clinical procedures creates compressive forces on the cervical discs due to neck flexion and compressive forces on the lumbar discs due to axial loading (the weight of the body compressing the spine vertically).  When these compressive forces are applied for year after year on a daily basis, the result can be an accelerated deterioration of the intervertebral discs.

For more information on how disability insurers evaluate claims based on Degenerative Disc Disease, see:

A Stiff Upper Lip Can Lead to Getting Stiffed by Your Insurer

Disability Insurance: Who Gets Denied?

Myelopathy: Part 1

Myelopathy: Part 2

[1] http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/degenerative-disc-disease/

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Provident Loses the Battle Over Discovery of Employee Compensation and Bonus Information Tied to the Denial of Insurance Benefits.

In previous posts entitled “Why Is It So Hard To Collect On My Disability Insurance Policy?” and “Does Your Unum Claims Handler Have a Personal Financial Incentive to Deny or Terminate Your Disability Claim?”, we reviewed a leading reason behind insurance companies denying disability insurance claims: claims managers often receive incentives, including bonuses, depending on the amount of money they save the company.  For the claims department, saving the company money is frequently achieved by denying the claims of existing customers who are receiving disability insurance benefits.  This conflict of interest is a probable basis for denial or termination of many legitimate disability claims.

A recent discovery decision by the United States District Court, N.D. California in Welle v. Provident Life & Accident Ins. Co., 2013 WL 5663221 (N.D. Cal., Oct. 17, 2013) comes as a major win for those with legitimate disability claims.  There, Doctor Dana Welle injured her left arm in a bike accident.   After multiple surgeries, she was diagnosed with ulnar neuropathy and left medial epicondylitis.  This condition gave her pain and weakness in her left arm that impacted her ability to safely care for her patients.  After Provident Life Insurance (a Unum company) had paid almost three years of disability insurance benefits to Ms. Welle, the company denied her benefits.[1]

In her suit against Provident, which claimed bad faith denial of her benefits, Dr. Welle alleged that Provident’s “incentive structure was based on performance, and performance may be measured, in terms of resolution of claims, including her own.”[2]  Dr. Welle requested Provident to produce “any and all documents that reflect, refer or relate to bonus awards, including but not limited to the performance rating and percent of bonus awarded” to claims managers and claim handlers.[3]

Provident objected to the request because, as they argued, it was overly broad and sought to obtain information that was private, proprietary and confidential.  The Court overruled Provident’s objections and allowed the discovery.  The Court reasoned that the information she sought in her requests “speaks to whether her claim was improperly denied and whether Provident encourages bad faith practices.”[4]

The Court further reasoned that Dr. Welle had shown compelling need for the documents that related to the bonuses of those involved in adjusting her disability insurance claim, and that the information was “highly relevant to her bad faith claim.”[5]  The Court disagreed with Provident’s concern with the request being overly broad because it only requested bonus and performance related information of specific individuals.   The Court also disagreed with Provident’s defense that discovering the information would breach the employees’ privacy rights, or that the information was proprietary and confidential, because Dr. Welle had already stipulated to a confidentiality agreement and protective order that covered the entire proceeding.[6]

Thus, the Court allowed discovery of the employees’ bonus and performance related compensation documents.  Though this is not the end of Dr. Welle’s fight to receive her legitimate disability insurance benefits, it is a major step in helping her get the ammunition she needs to assure her of future benefits under the policy.


[1] Welle v. Provident Life & Accident Ins. Co., 2013 WL 5663221 (N.D. Cal., Oct. 17, 2013).

[2] Id.

[3] Id.

[4] Id.

[5] Id.

[6] Id.

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Physicians and Dentists With Parkinson’s Disease: The Condition, Its Occupational Impact and Disability

Introduction

Among the most devastating degenerative medical conditions is Parkinson’s disease, which currently affects 6.3 million people worldwide. While certain genetic conditions and environmental triggers may increase susceptibility to the disease, it is impossible to accurately predict who will develop it.

For healthcare professionals (physicians and dentists) diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, the disease can be career-ending as symptoms become more severe. This post will provide a brief overview of Parkinson’s disease; explain the limitations the condition may create and how this could impact a professional career; and provide a solid base of information for anyone struggling with the prospect or process of filing a disability insurance claim.

Background

Every year, there are approximately 60,000 new diagnoses of Parkinson’s disease, a condition affecting the nervous system, motor control, and brain chemistry. Recent improvements in treatments, including exciting therapies involving “reprogramming” skin cells to behave like stem cells, act as small steps toward a solution, but there is currently no cure for Parkinson’s disease. Sufferers often go undiagnosed for many years, and because of the progressive nature of the illness, it can cause a slow deterioration in ability to function normally in day-to-day life.

Disease Progression

After the initial diagnosis and into early stages of Parkinson’s disease, symptoms may seem manageable and typically include fatigue, tremors, joint pain, and anxiousness.

As the disorder progresses, it is common to experience stiffness, lack of coordination, and slower movement. Everyday tasks such as getting dressed, shaving, writing, and brushing teeth can become strained, and there is a high susceptibility to falls and related injuries due to disturbed sense of balance.

Once Parkinson’s disease reaches advanced stages, affected individuals sometimes lose the ability to walk, speak, and properly care for themselves. Since Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system, it can result in chemical changes within the brain, causing individuals to experience symptoms involving disruption of mental clarity, altered judgment, anxiety, or depression. In effort to control challenging symptoms, sufferers often go through the frustrating experience of experimenting with new medications, which can also produce unpleasant side effects.

Medical Professionals Diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease

It is understandably difficult to grasp the frustrating new limitations that go along with Parkinson’s disease, as symptoms sometimes come and go, progressing gradually over time. Doctors who have been diagnosed with the illness may be tempted to continue practicing as usual, despite their worsening symptoms. Unfortunately, the reality is that the slightest side effect, such as tremor or delayed reaction time could potentially have life-altering consequences for practitioners or their patients. Should a doctor be sued for medical malpractice post-diagnosis, a jury could be convinced that the doctor should not have been practicing due to the nature of the illness, regardless of whether or not it was a factor in the incident. The dichotomy between lifelong work ethic and patient safety is what makes Parkinson’s disease so devastating to physicians and dentists – considering the amount of time, energy, and money invested into a professional career, there is a reasonable hesitancy to take a step back.

When to File a Disability Insurance Claim

Early Parkinson’s disease symptoms mimic other more common ailments, often causing the condition to go undiagnosed for lengthy periods of time; furthering the problem, no one test is able to confirm a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. Individuals undergoing the diagnosis process frequently experience a trial-and-error scenario, and symptom improvement with specific medications is often the litmus test for whether or not a person truly has the disease. These factors make it very difficult to determine when a disability insurance claim should be filed – when filed too soon, there may not be substantive proof of disability, but waiting too long could leave a practitioner exposed to liability.

A common mistake for sufferers of Parkinson’s disease is the attempt to modify work schedules and regular work duties with the progression of symptoms. Despite the fact that these measures are taken to avoid the risk of injury to the affected doctors or to their patients, the impact of this decision on future disability claims is substantial. A practitioner will typically perform fewer procedures, take on more management duties, and scale back hours over a period of time until working is no longer an option. The modification of one’s scope of practice and work hours can make it extraordinarily difficult, if not impossible, to collect future disability benefits, as insurance companies define a practitioner’s occupation (and ability to receive benefits) based on the work done at the time he or she becomes totally disabled. In short, this means that as one modifies his or her duties and hours, he or she is modifying both position and capability in the eyes of a disability insurance company to something less than that of a full time clinical practitioner. Keeping this in mind, it is best to explore the possibility of filing a total disability insurance claim as soon as possible after diagnosis, and it is prudent to speak with an attorney who is well-versed in filing disability claims.

Summary

Parkinson’s disease has had a personal impact on the lives of staff at Comitz Beethe, and we are no strangers to how difficult it can be to deal with long-term medical issues. Perhaps the most important step in accepting and understanding Parkinson’s disease is taking the time to get the help you need. Seek the support of family, friends, and professionals to help you cope with the changes ahead.

Additionally, understand that knowledge is power. Parkinson’s disease can have a major impact on finances, relationships, work, time, and various other aspects of daily life. Educating yourself about the future and what to expect, including when to file a disability insurance claim, will help you to feel more prepared and able to face challenges as they arise.

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The Injured Physician: Is Your Work Ethic Hurting You and Your Patients?

AzMedicine - cover Winter 2013

Comitz | Beethe disability insurance attorneys Edward O. Comitz and Patrick T. Stanley recently had their article “The Injured Physician:  Is Your Work Ethic Hurting You and Your Patients?” published in the Winter 2013 edition of AzMedicine, the quarterly publication of the Arizona Medical Association.

In the article, Mr. Comitz and Mr. Stanley review some of the unintended consequences, both professional and personal, of a physician continuing to work through adversity, and the potential impact on his or her disability insurance coverage.  For example, a physician who has modified his practice or work schedule in an effort to accommodate a disability may effectively change his occupational definition as it is defined in his “own occupation” disability insurance policy, making it difficult, if not impossible, to collect benefits when they are most needed.

The article also analyzes some of the pitfalls of “residual disability” or “partial disability” riders, such as the manner in which the insurer will determine the amount of benefits paid and differences in how long the insurance company is required to pay benefits.

The Arizona Medical Association periodically updates its website with recent editions of AzMedicine, or you may contact our office to obtain a copy of the full article and/or to speak with a disability insurance attorney.

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Attorney Ed Comitz Interviewed by The Street re Disability Insurance

Scottsdale attorney Edward O. Comitz was recently consulted by the popular financial website The Street regarding his thoughts on whether it’s a good financial decision to purchase an individual disability insurance policy.   Based on the high premiums and his experience as an attorney who specializes in assisting sick or injured claimants with obtaining the individual disability insurance benefits to which they are entitled, Mr. Comitz advised that, with the exception of medical professionals such as dentists and surgeons – for whom even a minor injury can be career-ending – disability insurance is not a good investment unless you are also prepared to incur the costs of hiring an attorney if your claim is denied or terminated.

The full article can be read on The Street’s website here.

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