Tag Archives: doctor depression

Chronic Pain and Anxiety Disorders

Chronic pain by itself is often debilitating, and the struggle to obtain a correct diagnosis, effective pain management, and ongoing treatment can be stressful and overwhelming.  As we discussed in a previous post, depression often co-occurs with chronic pain, and can further complicate treatment.  The same is true of anxiety disorders.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Anxiety

Like depression, anxiety is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

It is no secret that physicians and dentists have stressful and demanding careers.  One Cardiff University study showed that of 2,000 British doctors, at various stages of their careers, 60% had experienced mental illness.[1]  Often practitioners ignore or fight through both chronic pain and anxiety and show up to work, to the point of endangering themselves or others before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.

While anxiety alone can result in an inability to practice, either indefinitely or in the short-term, it is also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain to experience an anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are also the most common type of psychiatric disorders in the United States, with 19 million adults affected.[2]

Chronic Pain and Anxiety—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can be anxiety provoking for a physician, who must (1) face giving up a career he or she invested so much time and financial resources to establish; (2) seek a correct diagnosis, course of treatment, and adequate pain management; and (3) often struggle with adapting to the loss of a previously enjoyed quality of life.  Conversely, chronic pain is also common in people with anxiety disorders,[3]  with up to 70% of people with certain medical conditions (including hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis) had an anxiety disorder first.[4]

Regardless of whether anxiety or chronic pain came first, individuals suffering from anxiety can experience pain that is particularly intense and hard to treat.[5]  In a 2013 study, 45% of 250 patients who had moderate to severe chronic joint or back pain screened positive for at least one of the common anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety, social anxiety, PTSD, OCD).  Further, those that had an anxiety disorder reported significantly worse pain and health-related quality of life than their counterparts without anxiety.[6]

Symptoms of Anxiety[7]

There are several anxiety disorders and, while the below list is by no means exhaustive, sufferers of anxiety often exhibit the following symptoms:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness, feeling wound-up or on edge, irritability, muscle tension
  • Being easily fatigued and problems with sleep
  • Difficulty concentrating or having their minds go blank

Panic Disorder

  • Sudden and repeated attacks of intense fear
  • Feelings of being out of control during a panic attack
  • Intense worries about when the next attack will happen
  • Avoidance of places where panic attacks have occurred in the past

Social Anxiety Disorder

  • Feeling highly anxious about being around other people (including having a hard time talking to them, blushing, sweating, trembling, or feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Feeling self-conscious in front of others and worried about feeling humiliated, embarrassed or rejected, or fearful of offending others
  • Worrying before an event and/or avoiding places where there are other people
  • Having a hard time making and keeping friends

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Flashbacks, bad dreams, difficulty sleeping, frightening thoughts, angry outbursts
  • Avoiding places, events, objects, thoughts, or feelings that are reminders of the traumatic experience and trouble remembering key features of the traumatic event
  • Being easily startled and feeling tense or “on edge”
  • Negative feelings about oneself or the world, and distorted feelings like guilt or blame
  • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • Fear of germs or contamination
  • Unwanted or forbidden thoughts, including aggressive thoughts towards others or self
  • Having things symmetrical or in perfect order; excessive clearing and/or hand washing; ordering and arranging things in a precise way; repeatedly checking on things; compulsive counting

Treatments for Anxiety

Some of the treatments that have been successful in addressing anxiety in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Support groups
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

[1] Michael Brooks, Why doctors’ mental health should be a concern for us all, NewStatesmen, April 11, 2016, http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2016/04/why-doctors-mental-health-should-be-concern-us-all

[2] What are Anxiety Disorders?, Global Medical Education, https://www.gmeded.com/gme-info-graphics/what-are-anxiety-disorders

[3] Chronic Pain, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, April, 2016, https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain

[4] Global Medical Education, Supra.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection

[6] Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, Chronic pain sufferers likely to have anxiety, ScienceDaily, May 8, 2013, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130508213112.htm

[7] Definitions according to National Institute of Mental Health: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml

Share

Can Your iPhone Tell You if You are Depressed?

Smartphones are getting smarter, and the desire for convenience and streamlined administration is at an all-time high. We have taken a look at how Skype doctors could potentially influence your medical treatment, but what if your smartphone could predict depression without the help of a medical professional? A new app claims to be able to identify people who are at a higher risk for depression.

The Purple Robot

The “Purple Robot” is an app in development at Northwestern University. While it isn’t available to the public yet, the app was able to identify 87% of participants who were determined to be at risk of depression. How? By tracking GPS data that showed how much users moved between their regular locations. The more users moved, the less likely they were to be considered at-risk.

The Purple Robot also could detect 74% of higher-risk participants by figuring out who used their phone the most for texting, playing games, and checking social media. Talking on the phone more frequently, on the other hand, was not indicative of a greater chance of depression. Unfortunately, there wasn’t enough data, probably due to the small number of participants in the study, for researchers to determine the effectiveness of the app using both GPS and phone usage trends.

Pros and Cons?

Currently, this app only can tell you if you have an above-average chance of having depression and cannot diagnose it. While it certainly could help people to recognize if they need to see their doctor to discuss their potential depression, it could also potentially incorrectly identify you for being at risk. The test in the study used a low cutoff score, so it may have identified people for being at risk when they actually weren’t.

The Purple Robot is still in testing, and its developers at Northwestern University are planning on including more data, such as how long people talk on the phone and who they talk to, into the analysis. They are also encrypting the data, which provides some peace of mind for those who are concerned about data leaks.

Even if the app is changed to become more accurate, the GPS capabilities may be a turn-off for some people. Especially due to the hype surrounding multiple recent data hacks, having your GPS location at risk is definitely something to consider before using this app.

Conclusion

Since this app has not been revealed to the public, we don’t know quite what effect it would have on the disability insurance claims process. We do, however, recommend that you are cautious about the apps that you use that involve your health, especially if you think you may eventually have to file for disability.

We would also advise that you speak with your doctor if you think that you may be depressed. While these apps may assist you in realizing that you need to seek help, they aren’t yet able to substitute for diagnosis from a medical professional.

Share

Protecting the Protectors: Depression, Medical Professionals, and the Conflicts Involved with Under-reporting

Depressed-Doctor

Today we’re taking a closer look at how depression can affect doctors and dentists, their practices, and the way they file for disability insurance. We examine how the medical community’s approach toward mental health is perhaps preventing some doctors from reporting illness, and how this changes a doctor’s ability to obtain adequate treatment and secure disability insurance benefits.

Depression and anxiety are undeniably prevalent among physicians and dentists.  For instance, a study in Australia showed that the rates of depression in doctors is four times higher than the general population and in a British study, 60% of dentists surveyed reported being anxious, tense, or depressed.

Simply looking at the daily life of doctors, and comparing that to the risk factors for depression shows some striking connections between the two. Some of the risk factors associated with depression (as outlined by the Mayo Clinic) include being overly self-critical, having serious or chronic illness and dealing with traumatic or stressful events. Interestingly, these are many things that doctors and dentists struggle with; indeed, probably more often than the average person. Doctors and dentists have to be self-critical because if they aren’t, lives could be at stake. In addition, doctors and dentists often suffer from chronic illness and pain due to the physically and emotionally taxing nature of their work. Worrying about patients, running a practice, and working long hours are all part of the job description for the average doctor.

While physicians and dentists commonly have symptoms of depression, they often don’t report their issues due to the stigma of mental health issues within the medical community. Lay people look to doctors and dentists as the paragon of health, and physicians take the same approach: while their patients are characterized by their illness, physicians are supposed to be the ones who cure them. While the general populace’s approach to mental illness has improved greatly over time (we no longer lock people in tiny jail cells simply because they are mentally ill), the negative stigma attached to depression and anxiety in the medical and dental community is still present. In the Australian study noted above, half of the respondents reported thinking that they were less likely to be appointed to a new position if they had a history of mental illness, and 40% admitted thinking less of doctors that have a history of depression or anxiety.

Nevertheless, it is important for doctors to recognize whether they exhibit signs of mental illness. Aside from needing to be mindful of their own health and well-being, doctors are responsible for the health and well-being of their patients, too.  Physicians and dentists both are in the unique position that a mistake that they make at work could endanger a life. Attempting to work through depression and anxiety symptoms that impair the doctor’s ability to provide responsible patient care could lead to a malpractice suit. Perhaps the solution to this issue is a re-evaluation of the medical community’s approach to mental illness. While that seems like a large task to take on, it starts with each individual doctor either seeking treatment for mental health, or supporting those that do.

For physicians, states have programs in place called Physician Health Programs (PHPs) that are supposed to support the health, including mental health, of medical licensees. A PHP is advertised as a way to get the help one needs, while avoiding disciplinary action such as a loss of license. Physicians should be aware, however, that PHPs are often connected to the licensing boards, and non-compliance with the PHP can lead to disciplinary action. For example, in Arizona, while the PHP is operated by an independent agency, it does have a formal contractual relationship with the state licensing board.

Continue reading Protecting the Protectors: Depression, Medical Professionals, and the Conflicts Involved with Under-reporting

Share