Tag Archives: private investigation

I used to practice __________ but now I’m _____________?

 

You spent years in school and invested countless hours to establish and maintain your practice.  You even protected this investment by purchasing a disability policy.  Yet, if you do become disabled and make a claim, your insurer might still make the argument that you are only trying to retire and get paid for it.  Unfortunately, disability insurance claims by doctors and other healthcare professionals are especially targeted for denial or termination.

When you are disabled and are no longer able to practice in your profession, it may seem logical to simply refer to yourself as “retired,” especially if you are not working in another capacity.  While it’s certainly understandable that you may not want to explain to everyone who asks why you’ve hung up your lab coat, you need to keep in mind that innocently referring to yourself as retired will likely prompt your insurer to subject your claim to higher scrutiny.  Insurance companies often attempt to take statements out of context in order to deny or terminate benefits by alleging that a legitimately disabled claimant is:

  • Malingering
  • Making a lifestyle choice.
  • Unmotivated by or unsatisfied with work.
  • Embracing the sick role.

Remember, in the insurance company’s mind, there is a big difference between “disabled” and “retired.” Below are some common situations where you should avoid referring to yourself as retired:

  • When asked for your profession on claim forms.
  • When talking to your doctors or filling out medical paperwork.
  • On your taxes, other financial forms, and applications.
  • Around the office.
  • At social functions or gatherings.
  • On social media.

Insurers can—and often do—employ private investigators to follow claimants on social media; interview staff, family, or acquaintances; and track down “paper trail” documents (such as professional license renewal forms, loan applications, etc.) to see if you have made any statements that could be construed as inconsistent with your disability claim.  Insurers also routinely request medical records and may even contact your doctor(s) directly regarding your disability.  So, for example, saying something off-hand or even jokingly, such as “I’m retired—I can stay out as late as I want now!” to your doctor, or at a social event like a block party, could lead to your insurer trying to deny your claim if they later spoke to your doctor or your neighbor.

While the focus of your claim should be on your condition and how it prevents you from working, insurance companies can latch on to innocent statements like this in an effort to deny legitimate claims. Eschewing the word “retirement” is a good and easy first step to help avoid unwanted and unwarranted scrutiny from insurers.

Out of Contract Demands: When You Can Tell Your Disability Insurer “No”

Every disability insurance policy is a contract. With this contract come certain rights and obligations on the part of the disability insurance company and on the part of the policyholder. The insurer promises to pay you disability benefits and you promise to fulfill certain conditions. One of the most important things to remember about this contractual relationship is that if it’s not in your policy, you don’t have to do it.

Often, disability insurers will ask a person filing for benefits to do certain things or provide certain information in order to qualify for benefits. What every policyholder needs to realize is that the disability insurer cannot force you to do something that is not outlined in your policy. There are many examples of disability insurance companies’ demands that may not be required under the terms of the policy, such as:

• That you see a certain type of doctor

• That you undergo surgery for your disabling condition

• That you get a particular treatment or therapy

• That you provide your Social Security or workers’ compensation claim file

• That you attend a certain type of examination

• That you complete detailed descriptions of your daily activities

• That you allow a private investigator into your home

The bottom line is that a policyholder filing for disability insurance benefits should know what their policy requires and what it doesn’t. The best way to be sure an insurer doesn’t get away with making extra-contractual demands is to have a disability insurance attorney review your policy and advocate with the company for your rights.