Tag Archives: spinal osteoarthritis

Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 7 – Myelopathy

In this series, we have been reviewing spine-related musculoskeletal conditions that are frequently seen in dentists and surgeons.  In this post, we will be looking at myelopathy.

Myelopathy

Definition: Myelopathy is damage to the spinal cord caused either by a traumatic injury or a chronic musculoskeletal condition. The term myelopathy generally refers to damage to the spinal cord, but may be used in reference to a handful of specific conditions, including:

  • Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: This is by far the most common form of myelopathy and involves the compression of the spinal cord in the cervical spine (neck). We will discuss cervical spondylotic myelopathy further below.
  • Thoracic Myelopathy: This occurs in the middle region of the spine. Typically, the spine gets compressed due to bulging or herniated discs, bone spurs, or spinal trauma.
  • Lumbar Myelopathy: This is a rare condition because the spinal cord typically ends in the upper section of the lumbar spine; however, the if the spinal cord is low-lying or tethered, it can be affected by this condition.

Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

Overview:  Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is damage to the spinal cord due to spinal degeneration, most commonly in the form of spinal osteoarthritis. As the spinal cord is compressed (spinal stenosis) due to inflammation and osteophytes, it can cause damage to the spinal cord and lead to an array of neurological symptoms.

Causes:  As discussed above, the inflammation and bone spurs (osteophytes) common to spinal osteoarthritis can exert pressure on the spinal cord and cause damage.  Bulging and herniated discs and thickened ligaments can also contribute to myelopathy.  In rarer cases an acute, traumatic injury to the neck can result in myelopathy.

Symptoms:  Numbness, weakness, and/or tingling in the hands or arms, loss of balance, stiffness in the legs, and urinary urgency.

Diagnosis: A CT scan with a Myelogram is used to reveal indentations in the spinal fluid sac.  In this procedure an opaque dye is injected into the spinal canal prior to the CT scan to create contrast and provide images of the spinal canal.  This is done in conjunction with an MRI, which provides imaging of the spinal cord and nerve roots, as well as the intervertebral discs and spinal ligaments.

Treatment: Surgery to decompress the spinal cord and prevent further damage is the most common treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.  The precise nature of the surgery varies and depends on the severity of the condition and its location.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described below and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.

Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 6 – Degenerative Disc Disease

In this series, we have been examining spine-related musculoskeletal conditions.  In this post, we will be looking at degenerative disc disease.

Degenerative Disc Disease

Definition: Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is the breakdown in the size and cushioning of the intervertebral discs.

Overview: The name of the condition is actually somewhat of a misnomer – it is not actually a “disease”, but rather a condition that is characterized by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs over time.  Over time, the pressure and wear of repetitive use can cause discs to lose some of their water content and volume, reducing their ability to cushion and insulate the vertebrae from one another.

Symptoms: The symptoms most commonly associated with DDD are chronic pain, weakness, numbness, and tingling in the extremities, and reduced flexibility in the spine. Not all people with intervertebral disc degeneration, however, experience pain or other symptoms.  This is due to the fact that the degeneration of the discs, by itself, does not bring on the symptoms described above. However, as disc degeneration becomes more severe, it can lead to other conditions that bring on the symptoms people normally associate with DDD (e.g., pain, numbness and tingling, weakness, etc.).  Some of the conditions commonly associated with DDD are spinal osteoarthritis, spinal stenosis, and foraminal stenosis.

Causes: Reduction in the size and cushioning of your discs is part of the normal process of aging, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown that almost everyone over the age of 60 has degeneration of their intervertebral discs to some degree.[1]  Not all people with disc degeneration have back pain or other symptoms – in fact, individuals with relatively mild disc degeneration may experience no symptoms whatsoever.

However, age is not the only factor in DDD.  Deterioration of the intervertebral discs can be accelerated and exacerbated by other factors.  The culprit in many severe cases of DDD is stress-related damage in the form of repetitive use, trauma, injury, poor posture, poor movement, and obesity.  Among these, one of the most common factors is repetitive use.  For example, the repetitive, static posture of a dentist during clinical procedures creates (1) compressive forces on the cervical discs due to neck flexion, and (2) compressive forces on the lumbar discs due to axial loading.  When these compressive forces are applied year after year on a daily basis, the result can be an accelerated deterioration of the intervertebral discs.

Diagnosis: Diagnosis will generally begin with a physical exam in which the physician will perform a variety of tests to evaluate the patient’s strength and range of motion.  If the physical tests indicate DDD, an MRI is typically ordered to measure the disc space and check for cartilage erosion.

Treatment: Because DDD can cause such a broad range of symptoms and subsequent conditions, the treatment options vary widely.  Depending on the circumstances, treatment can range from conservative options such as physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications to surgical intervention in the form of a discectomy, laminectomy, laminoplasty, or spinal fusion.

Our next and final post in this series will discuss myelopathy.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described below and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

[1] Degenerative Disc Disease, Arthritis Foundation, http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/degenerative-disc-disease/

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.

 

Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 3 – Stenosis

In this series, we have been looking at spine-related musculoskeletal conditions that many dentists and surgeons suffer from.  In this post, we will be looking at spinal and foraminal stenosis.

Cervical Spinal Stenosis:

Definition: The narrowing of the spinal canal in the cervical vertebrae, often due to inflammation of the surrounding cartilage and tissue.

Overview: The spinal canal is formed by the hollow spaces in the middle of the vertebrae, which form a protective tunnel for the spinal cord to pass through the spinal column. Cervical spinal stenosis is a progressive and potentially dangerous condition that occurs when inflammation narrows the cervical spinal canal. The narrowing of this already tight space can result in direct pressure on the spinal cord, leading to a number of neurological complications.  Cervical spinal stenosis can be crippling if the spinal cord becomes damaged.

Symptoms: Symptoms usually develop gradually over time and can include numbness, weakness, tingling in neck, shoulders, arms, hands, or legs, as well as intermittent, sharp pain in the arms and legs, especially when bending forward.  Deterioration of fine motor skills and issues with gait and balance can also occur.  In more severe cases, bladder and bowel issues may develop.

Causes: Though in rare cases cervical spinal stenosis is a congenital condition, it often results from inflammation due to other spinal conditions, such as spinal osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease, and disc bulging.

Diagnosis: A combination of X-ray, MRI, and computed tomography (CT) scans may be used to diagnose spinal stenosis.  Blood tests may be used to eliminate other diseases such as multiple sclerosis and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Treatment: Conservative, non-invasive treatments may include exercise, physical therapy, and activity modification.  Medications may include anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotic pain medication, muscle relaxers, and epidural steroid injections.  In more severe cases, several surgical options exist, dependent upon the particular characteristics of the patient’s condition:

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy/corpectomy with fusion (ADCF): The spine is accessed through the front of the patient’s neck, the disc is removed from between the two vertebrae, and the vertebrae are then fused together to stabilize the spine.
  2. Laminectomy: This is a “decompression” surgical procedure performed to relieve pressure on the spinal cord. In this surgery, the lamina (the rear portion of the vertebra covering the spinal canal) is removed from the affected vertebra to enlarge the spinal canal and decrease pressure on the spinal cord.
  3. Interspinous Process Spacers: In this procedure, small metal spacers are surgically placed between the vertebrae to restore the spacing typically created by a healthy disc. This procedure is typically reserved for individuals with foraminal stenosis, however, and has only had limited effectiveness with patients suffering from spinal stenosis.

Foraminal Stenosis

Definition: Compression of the nerve roots connected to the spinal cord, caused by the narrowing of the passageway through which the nerves exit the spinal column.

Overview: The nerve roots branching off the spinal cord to other parts of the body exit the spinal column through small openings on the sides of the vertebrae called a foramen. This space can become clogged or narrowed due to a number of spine-related conditions. The narrowing or partial obstruction of the foraminal canal caused by one of these conditions can put pressure on the nerve roots emerging from the spinal column, and may lead to an array of neurological symptoms that get progressively worse over time.

Symptoms: Tingling, numbness, or weakness in the feet or hands.  Local pain in the extremities.  “Pins and needles” or burning sensation. Intermittent neck or back pain.

Causes: Bulging or herniated discs may obstruct the foraminal canal, putting pressure on the nerve roots.  It can also be caused by spinal osteoarthritis, osteophytes, and spondylolisthesis.  Dentists are susceptible to foraminal stenosis, as they often hold their necks in extended positions.

Diagnosis: A CT scan and a Myelogram are used to diagnose foraminal stenosis. A Myelogram is an X-ray in which an opaque dye (which shows up on the X-ray) is injected into the sac around the nerve roots. The dye moves through the foramina, allowing the doctor to see the degree to which the foramen is narrowed or obstructed.

Treatments: Conservative treatments may include physical therapy, stretching and strength training, and oral pain-relieving medication. Corticosteroid injections are an option for more severe cases to reduce inflammation and pain.  In extreme cases, a surgical procedure known as a foraminotomy may be used to remove the bone spur or disc material that is putting pressure on the nerve root as it exits the spinal column through the foramen.

Our next post in this series will discuss spondylolisthesis.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described below and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.

Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 2 – Spinal Osteoarthritis

In the first part of this series, we discussed the fact that dentists and surgeons often suffer from musculoskeletal conditions.  In the remaining posts in this series, we will be looking at particular musculoskeletal conditions, starting with spinal osteoarthritis.

Spinal Osteoarthritis

Definition: Spinal osteoarthritis is also known as degenerative joint disease. It is a breakdown of the cartilage in the facet joints, which link together the spine’s vertebrae.

Overview: At the top and bottom of each vertebra is a small pair of joints called facets. Facets connect the vertebrae in order to restrict movement in certain directions and to allow the spine to move as one fluid unit.  The surfaces of the facets, like any other joint in the human body, are covered by a lubricating cartilage which allows them to operate smoothly and with little friction.

When the cartilage protecting the facets degrades or wears down, the bony surfaces of the facets rub against each other.  This can cause inflammation, severe pain, and the formation of osteophytes (bone spurs) on or around the joint surfaces.  It may also cause numbness and/or weakness in the legs and arms as a result of contact between the vertebrae and the nerves leaving the spinal cord.

Symptoms: Neck pain and stiffness. Severe pain may radiate down into shoulders and up the neck.  Weakness, numbness, or tingling in the fingers, hands, and/or arms are also often present.  Usually back discomfort is relieved when a person is lying down.  Studies have also linked anxiety and depression to osteoarthritis.[1]

Causes: Spinal osteoarthritis frequently occurs in conjunction with degenerative disc disease.  As the discs between the vertebrae in the spinal column degrade and decrease in volume, the increased pressure and contact between the facet joints can cause an accelerated degradation of the joint cartilage.

Repetitive strain or stress on the spine, often due to poor posture, to is a common cause of spinal osteoarthritis.  People with jobs requiring repetitive movements and strained positions are considered to be at greater risk for conditions like spinal osteoarthritis; however, injury or trauma to a joint or a genetic defect involving cartilage are also causes.  Dentists are at a higher risk than many other professions to develop this condition due to the awkward, static postures they must maintain.

Diagnosis: X-rays may be used to identify loss of cartilage, bone spurs, and bone damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used to analyze the intervertebral discs and the nerves exiting the spinal column.

Treatment: Conservative, non-invasive treatment plans may include some combination of heat/cold therapy, medication, physical therapy, strength training, and stretching. In more severe cases, a surgical treatment such as spinal fusion is utilized.

Our next post in this series will examine spinal stenosis, another common cause of neck and back pain.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described below and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

[1] Sharma, A., et. al, Anxiety and depression in patients with osteoarthritis: impact and management challenges, Open Access Rheumatology: Research and Reviews 2016:8 (2016).

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.

Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 1 – Spondylosis

Living with a spine-related condition can be scary and overwhelming. Unfortunately, the complex nature of the spine and the nervous system can often make the search for answers a frustrating and demoralizing endeavor.  In this series of posts we are going to talk about several spine-related musculoskeletal conditions, many of which are frequently diagnosed in dentists, surgeons, and other physicians.

If you are suffering from a spine-related condition, you have likely visited not only your primary care physician, but also a physical therapist, a chiropractor, a neurologist, an orthopedic surgeon, and/or a pain management doctor.  It’s common for those suffering from a musculoskeletal condition to hear several different terms to describe a set of symptoms, be given multiple explanations for what is causing their pain, and be given a variety of (often conflicting) treatment recommendations.

Dentists and physicians in certain surgical specialties are particularly susceptible to spine-related musculoskeletal conditions, which are among the top reasons insureds file disability claims.  The forward-flexed, static posture that dentists and surgeons must maintain to perform procedures can lead to the overuse and repetitive strain of the neck and back, and contribute to the development of a litany of musculoskeletal conditions.  One study showed that 62% of the general population present musculoskeletal work-related pain, and this increased to 93% when the sample population was made up entirely of dentists.[1]  Unfortunately, although one often thinks of spinal and back injuries occurring later in life after years of strain, chronic musculoskeletal pain is experienced by many dentists by their third year of dental school.[2]

We’ve created this series of blog posts as a resource to help clear up some of the confusion surrounding the common terms used to refer to spine-related musculoskeletal conditions.  For each term we’ll provide a definition, overview, list of common symptoms, causes, methods of diagnosis, and common treatments. In this post, we’re going to briefly look at spondylosis, and then in later posts we will take a more in depth look at some other spine-related conditions.

Spondylosis

Definition: This is an umbrella term used to broadly describe degeneration in the spine.  Some doctors may use it interchangeably with spinal osteoarthritis.  Spondylosis is a descriptive term rather than a clinical diagnosis – it is used to describe anyone suffering from both pain and spinal degeneration.  If your doctor uses this term to describe your condition, you may want to your physician for a more specific diagnosis.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described above and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

[1] Dias, Ana Giselle Aguiar, et. al, Prevalence of repetitive strain injuries/work related musculoskeletal disorders in different specialties of dentists, RGO, Rev. Gauch. Odontol. Vol. 62 no. 2, Campinas Apr./June 2014,  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1981-8637201400020000042714  (citing Regis Filho GI, Michels G, Sell I. Lesões por esforços repetitivos/distúrbios osteomusculares relacionados ao trabalho em cirurgiões-dentistas. Rev Bras Epidemiol. 2006;9(3):346-59, http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1415-790X2006000300009&lng=en).

[2] Kristina Lynch, My back is hurting my practice, Part I, AGD Impact, Feb. 2006.

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.

Orthopedic Issues Series: Degenerative Disc Disease – Part 2

In Part 1 of this post, we discussed the anatomy of the spine and some of the causes of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD).   In Part 2 of this post, we will be discussing some of the symptoms of DDD, and some of the methods used to treat DDD.

Symptoms

Not all people with intervertebral disc degeneration experience pain or other symptoms.  This is due to the fact that the degeneration of the discs, by itself, does not bring on the symptoms described in the first paragraph above.  However, as disc degeneration becomes more severe, it can lead to other conditions that bring on the symptoms people normally associate with DDD (e.g., pain, numbness and tingling, weakness, etc.).  Some of the conditions commonly associated with DDD are:

  • Spinal osteoarthritis:  Sometimes referred to as spondylosis, this condition occurs when the breakdown of the cartilage and intervertebral discs leads to increased contact and irritation of the vertebrae.  It may also lead to the formation of osteophytes (abnormal bone growths) on the vertebrae that can also put pressure on nerves and contribute to the pain and nerve-related issues described above.
  • Spinal stenosis:  This condition can occur when an individual develops spondylosis. The inflammation associated with spinal osteoarthritis may cause a narrowing of the spinal canal (the hollow space in the middle of the vertebrae through which the spinal cord travels) and put pressure on the spinal cord.  This pressure on the spinal cord can cause numbness, weakness, cramping, or general pain in the arms and legs.  In some cases it can also cause bowel and bladder dysfunction.
  • Foraminal stenosis:  This condition is the result of reduced space between the vertebrae, often brought on by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs.  The reduced space may lead to increased pressure on nerve roots emerging from the spinal cord, resulting in localized pain as well as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the extremities.

Treatment:

Because DDD can cause such a broad range of symptoms and subsequent conditions, the treatment options vary widely.  Depending on the circumstances, treatment can range from conservative options, such as physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications, to surgical intervention, in the form of a discectomy, laminectomy, laminoplasty, or spinal fusion.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, the best course of action is to consult a physician.

For more information on how disability insurers evaluate claims based on Degenerative Disc Disease, see:

A Stiff Upper Lip Can Lead to Getting Stiffed by Your Insurer

Disability Insurance: Who Gets Denied?

Myelopathy: Part 1

Myelopathy: Part 2

Orthopedic Issues Series: Degenerative Disc Disease – Part 1

This post is the first in a series we will be doing on common orthopedic issues.  In Part 1 of this post, we will discuss the anatomy of the spine and some of the causes of Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD), a common yet misunderstood spinal condition that affects a large portion of the population.   In Part 2 of this post, we will go over some of the symptoms of DDD and some of the methods for treating DDD.

Anatomy

There are thirty-three vertebrae in the vertebral column of the human spine, twenty-four of which articulate and move.  Between each of the vertebrae in the three articulating sections of the spine – the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine – there is an intervertebral disc.  Each disc, composed of soft jelly-like center (nucleus pulposus) surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue (annulus fibrosis), provides shock absorption and flexibility within the spine.  There is very little blood flow to this region of the body, and if discs are damaged or deteriorate they cannot regrow or heal themselves.

Causes

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is the breakdown in the size and cushioning of the intervertebral discs, which can lead to chronic pain, weakness, numbness and tingling in extremities, and reduced flexibility in the spine. The name of the condition is actually somewhat of a misnomer – it is not actually a “disease”, but rather a condition that is characterized by the degeneration of the intervertebral discs over time. Because of this, the condition can be confusing to understand.

Reduction in the size and cushioning of your discs is part of the normal process of aging, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown that almost everyone over the age of 60 has degeneration of their intervertebral discs to some degree.[1]  Not all people with disc degeneration have back pain or other symptoms – in fact, individuals with relatively mild disc degeneration may experience no symptoms whatsoever.

However, age is not the only factor in DDD.  Deterioration of the intervertebral discs can be accelerated and exacerbated by other factors.  The culprit in many severe cases of DDD is stress-related damage in the form of repetitive use, trauma, injury, poor posture, poor movement, and obesity.  Among these, one of the most common factors is repetitive use.

Medical professionals are particularly susceptible to developing DDD due to the static postures that some specialties require in clinical practice, most notably dentists.  For example, the repetitive, static posture of a dentist performing clinical procedures creates compressive forces on the cervical discs due to neck flexion and compressive forces on the lumbar discs due to axial loading (the weight of the body compressing the spine vertically).  When these compressive forces are applied for year after year on a daily basis, the result can be an accelerated deterioration of the intervertebral discs.

For more information on how disability insurers evaluate claims based on Degenerative Disc Disease, see:

A Stiff Upper Lip Can Lead to Getting Stiffed by Your Insurer

Disability Insurance: Who Gets Denied?

Myelopathy: Part 1

Myelopathy: Part 2

[1] http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/degenerative-disc-disease/