Posture and Your Practice

Good posture is important for everyone, but especially for dentists, who spend a fair amount of time in static positions, making repetitive movements, or bending or twisting in ways that aren’t necessarily natural for human bodies. Today, we’re going to give you some tips on how to improve your posture and positioning in your everyday life as well as your practice, so that you may potentially avoid or delay future disabling pain.

General Posture

  • Keep your body in alignment.
    • While standing, this means distributing your weight evenly on both feet, and making sure that you keep your weight from shifting either forward on the balls of your feet or backward on your heels.
    • When seated, sit up straight and keep your ears, shoulders, and hips in a straight line. A good trick is to picture a balloon attached to the top of your head, pulling you upward.
  • Move around a bit.
    • When your muscles get tired, it’s much easier to slouch or fall into a position that might be comfortable now, but could strain parts of your body you don’t want strained. It’s important to walk around after every half-hour or so of sitting to stretch and refresh your body.
    • Also, moving around slightly while seated is a good way to refresh your muscles. Instead of making your back tight by forcing a constantly straight position, bend a little bit every now and then to reset your posture, and give yourself a break.
  • When working at a desk, use a chair that has good lumbar support or use a small pillow placed between your back and the chair.
    • The spine naturally curves in an “S” shape, so it is important to support your lower back. Ergonomically designed chairs can do this. Using a small pillow for your lower back can also help support your spine.
    • It is also important to sit back in your chair and not on the edge of the seat. A chair is able to provide a solid foundation for your seat only if you use all of the area.
  • Make sure your desk chair is properly aligned to your workspace.
    • Keep your feet flat on the floor and have your hips slightly higher than your knees when sitting at a desk. This will keep you from adding strain to your hip flexor muscles, which play a role in lower back stability.

In the Dental Chair

  • Keep your patient at waist level.
    • This enables you to maintain your proper posture and work safely within your patient’s mouth. It also helps keep your wrists straight, and elbows at 90 degrees, which puts less strain on your arms, shoulders and back.
    • To test it out, hold a 5–pound weight away from your body at waist–height and slowly move it in until your elbows are at 90 degrees. Notice how the weight is much more comfortable to hold when it is closer to your body.
  • Have your tools easily available.
    • Keep everything you may need within a short reach and in front of you so you don’t do any unnecessary twisting, bending or turning.
  • Have better designed tools.
    • You can get lighter tools and angled hand-pieces that allow you to better reach difficult places in your patient’s mouth. It would also be helpful to replace old hoses with ones that are designed to be lighter and straight, so you don’t have to fight the tension of a coil.
    • Gloves are also important: using ambidextrous gloves forces your thumb into an unnatural position and constrains your fingers into one plane, which isn’t anatomically correct. Look into purchasing gloves specifically for your left and right hands to avoid this strain.

While all of these tips can be helpful in preventing future pain, none of them are a cure-all for potential disabilities, and they may not “fix” pain that has already begun. It is essential to have a dialogue with your doctor about any issues that you may be having. It may also be useful to talk to a disability insurance lawyer if you think that your current or future pain may not allow you to continue practicing. We hope that these tips were helpful; let us know in the comments what worked for you!

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