Spine-Related Musculoskeletal Conditions – Part 1 – Spondylosis

Living with a spine-related condition can be scary and overwhelming. Unfortunately, the complex nature of the spine and the nervous system can often make the search for answers a frustrating and demoralizing endeavor.  In this series of posts we are going to talk about several spine-related musculoskeletal conditions, many of which are frequently diagnosed in dentists, surgeons, and other physicians.

If you are suffering from a spine-related condition, you have likely visited not only your primary care physician, but also a physical therapist, a chiropractor, a neurologist, an orthopedic surgeon, and/or a pain management doctor.  It’s common for those suffering from a musculoskeletal condition to hear several different terms to describe a set of symptoms, be given multiple explanations for what is causing their pain, and be given a variety of (often conflicting) treatment recommendations.

Dentists and physicians in certain surgical specialties are particularly susceptible to spine-related musculoskeletal conditions, which are among the top reasons insureds file disability claims.  The forward-flexed, static posture that dentists and surgeons must maintain to perform procedures can lead to the overuse and repetitive strain of the neck and back, and contribute to the development of a litany of musculoskeletal conditions.  One study showed that 62% of the general population present musculoskeletal work-related pain, and this increased to 93% when the sample population was made up entirely of dentists.[1]  Unfortunately, although one often thinks of spinal and back injuries occurring later in life after years of strain, chronic musculoskeletal pain is experienced by many dentists by their third year of dental school.[2]

We’ve created this series of blog posts as a resource to help clear up some of the confusion surrounding the common terms used to refer to spine-related musculoskeletal conditions.  For each term we’ll provide a definition, overview, list of common symptoms, causes, methods of diagnosis, and common treatments. In this post, we’re going to briefly look at spondylosis, and then in later posts we will take a more in depth look at some other spine-related conditions.

Spondylosis

Definition: This is an umbrella term used to broadly describe degeneration in the spine.  Some doctors may use it interchangeably with spinal osteoarthritis.  Spondylosis is a descriptive term rather than a clinical diagnosis – it is used to describe anyone suffering from both pain and spinal degeneration.  If your doctor uses this term to describe your condition, you may want to your physician for a more specific diagnosis.

These posts are for informative purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and diagnosis by a medical professional.  If you are experiencing any of the symptoms described above and have yet to consult with a doctor, do not use this resource to self-diagnose.  Please contact your doctor immediately and schedule an appointment to be evaluated for your symptoms.

[1] Dias, Ana Giselle Aguiar, et. al, Prevalence of repetitive strain injuries/work related musculoskeletal disorders in different specialties of dentists, RGO, Rev. Gauch. Odontol. Vol. 62 no. 2, Campinas Apr./June 2014,  http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1981-8637201400020000042714  (citing Regis Filho GI, Michels G, Sell I. Lesões por esforços repetitivos/distúrbios osteomusculares relacionados ao trabalho em cirurgiões-dentistas. Rev Bras Epidemiol. 2006;9(3):346-59, http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1415-790X2006000300009&lng=en).

[2] Kristina Lynch, My back is hurting my practice, Part I, AGD Impact, Feb. 2006.

References:

1. Spine-health, https://www.spine-health.com/.
2. Mayo Clinic, http://www.mayoclinic.org/.
3. The Neurological Institute of New York,
http://columbianeurology.org/about-us/neurological-institute-new-york.
4. John Hopkins Medicine, http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/.
5. WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/.


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