Disability Insurance: What Residents Need to Know – Part 3

In our previous posts in this series, we examined why residents should not wait to acquire disability coverage and discussed some key provisions to look for when selecting an individual disability policy.  In this post, we’ll be taking a look at a few more provisions you may want to look for when selecting a policy.  More specifically, we are going to look at some policy provisions that can help you meet your monthly expenses in the event of disability, along with some policy provisions that can help you plan for your retirement.

Student Loan Coverage Rider

If you are like most residents, you have accrued a significant amount of student loan debt.  The time it takes to pay off student loan debt varies widely based on income and other expenses.  Many doctors must practice for several years before they are able to pay off all of their student loans, and student loan obligations can be a significant monthly expense to meet if you are disabled and no longer able to practice.  Although not as common as other riders, a student loan coverage rider allows policy holders to insure their student loan for an additional amount each month, on top of their benefits.

Waiver of Premium

This provision allows you to forego paying your policy premiums while you are receiving disability benefits, freeing up a substantial portion of the monthly income you would otherwise be paying back to the insurance company.

Return of Premium

This provision, while not as common, entitles the policy holder to receive a refund of all premiums if he or she does not become disabled before the expiration of the policy term.  This can be appealing to residents, whose plans will be in effect for a long time.

Maximum Benefits

This important provision in a policy controls the period of time the insured is eligible to receive benefits.  Most plans pay benefits until age 65 or 67, some pay lifetime benefits, and others pay for only a limited amount of time, even if a claim is filed decades before the policy terminates.

Retirement Income

The majority of doctors under 40 list preparing for retirement as their top financial goal.[1]  There are several different disability policy riders directed towards this goal, including the following.

Graded Lifetime Benefit Rider:  This provision, based on its terms, extends some or all of your disability benefits past the normal end date of age 65 or 67.

Lump Sum Rider:  This rider provides for a one-time payment once the policy expiration age is reached.  Typically, policy holders must have received benefits for at least one year and the lump sum payment is typically a percentage of the aggregate sum of benefits received during the policy term.

Retirement Protection Insurance Depending on the insurer, this may be offered as a rider or a stand-alone policy.  If you become disabled and your claim is approved, your insurer will establish a trust for your benefit, where benefits are deposited and invested (similar to an employer-sponsored 401(k)), with funds likely becoming accessible after the age of 65.

Our next post in this series will discuss the importance of choosing a plan where benefits increase over time.

[1] 2015 Report on U.S. Physicians’ Financial Preparedness, Young Physicians Segment, American Medical Association Insurance, https://www.amainsure.com/reports/2015-young-physician-report/index.html?page=5.


Share

Disability Insurance: What Residents Need to Know – Part 2

In our previous post, we looked at how important it is for residents to have a plan to protect themselves financially in the unfortunate event they become disabled.  In this post we will address some critical terms to look for when comparing potential policies.

Perhaps the most important provision in your policy is the definition of “Total Disability.”  For physicians, dentists, and other highly specialized professionals who have invested both years and hundreds of thousands of dollars in their careers, a policy that defines “Total Disability” in terms of your inability to perform the specific duties of your “own occupation” (as opposed to “any occupation”) is critical.  If your policy defines “Total Disability” as being unable to work in “any occupation,” it will be much more difficult to establish that you are entitled to benefits, in the event you suffer from a disabling condition.

In addition to knowing and understanding your policy’s definition of “total disability,” it is also crucial to know how working in another profession is treated by your policy.   For instance, if you happened to be an oral surgeon with an essential tremor, you may no longer be able to operate safely on patients, but you may still be able (and want) to teach. Alternatively, if you happened to be a physician who did not take steps to increase your disability coverage to match your increases in earnings, working in another capacity may be the only way to maintain your lifestyle in the event of disability.  Consequently, it is also important to know if your policy will allow you to work in another capacity and still collect benefits.  Along those lines, here are a few other provisions you will want to watch out for.

No Work Provisions

These provisions mandate that you cannot work in another field and still receive benefits.  This can be problematic if you do not have sufficient disability coverage to meet all of your financial needs.

Work Provisions

These types of provisions require you to work in another occupation.  This, of course, can make it impossible to collect on your benefits if your disability prevents you from working.

In our next post we will look at how you can select a plan that grows with you over time, as both your financial obligations and income change.


Share

Disability Insurance: What Residents Need to Know – Part 1

 

As a medical resident who is just starting out, you have likely heard about disability insurance, but you may not know a lot about what it is, and why it is important.  In this series of posts, we will be discussing a few things that every medical resident should know about disability insurance.

In this post we will look at the likelihood of disability, and discuss how you can begin to protect yourself now and in the future.  In subsequent posts we’ll address some of the key provisions to look for in a disability insurance policy, ways to make sure your policy meets current and future expenses, and ways to increase your disability benefits over time, as both your earning potential and financial obligations expand.

Likelihood of Disability

As a resident, you are beginning what will hopefully be a long and successful career as a physician.  The possibility of suffering either a short or long-term disability is probably the last thing on your mind, especially if you are still young and healthy.  However, the American Medical Association (AMA) reports that 60% of surveyed physicians have a colleague who has sustained a disability accident or injury.[1]  A Social Security Administration report shows that it is significantly more likely that a worker born in 1996 will become disabled during his or her career than die,[2]  and just over 1 in 4 of today’s twenty-year-olds will become disabled before they retire.[3]

Protection Against Disability

The majority of young doctors under 40 are married, have children, are homeowners, and 75% report that they are their family’s primary breadwinner.[4]  Young doctors also face substantial student loan debt, totaling around $166,750, on average.  With a resident’s salary averaging just $50,000 a year,[5] it can be tempting to put off adding the additional expense of an insurance premium.  However, with most young doctors having less than $50,000 in an emergency fund [6], it’s never too early to start planning to protect your family and provide for care in the unfortunate event you can no longer practice.

While many residents and doctors choose to take part in disability plans offered by their employers, these plans will often not provide adequate coverage, and any benefits you do receive will likely be taxable. In contrast, an individual plan provides coverage that is yours as you move from your residency and through (potentially) many different employers. Individual plans also typically allow you to adjust your coverage as your income potential grows.[7]  However, not all individual policies are created equal and it is important to carefully choose a policy.

In our next post, we’ll examine some key provisions to be aware of when shopping for an individual disability insurance policy.

 

 

 

 

[1] Robert Nagler Miller, Residents: Your disability insurance coverage may fall short, AMA Wire, April 4, 2017, https://wire.ama-assn.org/life-career/residents-your-disability-insurance-coverage-may-fall-short

[2] Johanna Maleh and Tiffany Bosley, Disability and Death Probability Tables for Insured Workers Born in 1996, Social Security Administration, Office of the Chief Actuary, Actuarial Note, No. 2016.6, October 2016.

[3] You, disabled?  What are your chances?, The Council for Disability Awareness, 2015, http://www.disabilitycanhappen.org/chances_disability/

[4] 2015 Report on U.S. Physicians’ Financial Preparedness, Young Physicians Segment, American Medical Association Insurance, https://www.amainsure.com/reports/2015-young-physician-report/index.html?page=5

[5] Kathy Kristof, $1 million mistake: Becoming a doctor, CBS Money Watch, Sept. 10, 2013, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/1-million-mistake-becoming-a-doctor/

[6] 2015 Report, Supra.

[7] Miller, Supra.

[8] 2015 Report, Supra


Share

Chronic Pain and Anxiety Disorders

Chronic pain by itself is often debilitating, and the struggle to obtain a correct diagnosis, effective pain management, and ongoing treatment can be stressful and overwhelming.  As we discussed in a previous post, depression often co-occurs with chronic pain, and can further complicate treatment.  The same is true of anxiety disorders.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Anxiety

Like depression, anxiety is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

It is no secret that physicians and dentists have stressful and demanding careers.  One Cardiff University study showed that of 2,000 British doctors, at various stages of their careers, 60% had experienced mental illness.[1]  Often practitioners ignore or fight through both chronic pain and anxiety and show up to work, to the point of endangering themselves or others before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.

While anxiety alone can result in an inability to practice, either indefinitely or in the short-term, it is also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain to experience an anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are also the most common type of psychiatric disorders in the United States, with 19 million adults affected.[2]

Chronic Pain and Anxiety—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can be anxiety provoking for a physician, who must (1) face giving up a career he or she invested so much time and financial resources to establish; (2) seek a correct diagnosis, course of treatment, and adequate pain management; and (3) often struggle with adapting to the loss of a previously enjoyed quality of life.  Conversely, chronic pain is also common in people with anxiety disorders,[3]  with up to 70% of people with certain medical conditions (including hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis) had an anxiety disorder first.[4]

Regardless of whether anxiety or chronic pain came first, individuals suffering from anxiety can experience pain that is particularly intense and hard to treat.[5]  In a 2013 study, 45% of 250 patients who had moderate to severe chronic joint or back pain screened positive for at least one of the common anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety, social anxiety, PTSD, OCD).  Further, those that had an anxiety disorder reported significantly worse pain and health-related quality of life than their counterparts without anxiety.[6]

Symptoms of Anxiety[7]

There are several anxiety disorders and, while the below list is by no means exhaustive, sufferers of anxiety often exhibit the following symptoms:

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Difficulty controlling worry
  • Restlessness, feeling wound-up or on edge, irritability, muscle tension
  • Being easily fatigued and problems with sleep
  • Difficulty concentrating or having their minds go blank

Panic Disorder

  • Sudden and repeated attacks of intense fear
  • Feelings of being out of control during a panic attack
  • Intense worries about when the next attack will happen
  • Avoidance of places where panic attacks have occurred in the past

Social Anxiety Disorder

  • Feeling highly anxious about being around other people (including having a hard time talking to them, blushing, sweating, trembling, or feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Feeling self-conscious in front of others and worried about feeling humiliated, embarrassed or rejected, or fearful of offending others
  • Worrying before an event and/or avoiding places where there are other people
  • Having a hard time making and keeping friends

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Flashbacks, bad dreams, difficulty sleeping, frightening thoughts, angry outbursts
  • Avoiding places, events, objects, thoughts, or feelings that are reminders of the traumatic experience and trouble remembering key features of the traumatic event
  • Being easily startled and feeling tense or “on edge”
  • Negative feelings about oneself or the world, and distorted feelings like guilt or blame
  • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • Fear of germs or contamination
  • Unwanted or forbidden thoughts, including aggressive thoughts towards others or self
  • Having things symmetrical or in perfect order; excessive clearing and/or hand washing; ordering and arranging things in a precise way; repeatedly checking on things; compulsive counting

Treatments for Anxiety

Some of the treatments that have been successful in addressing anxiety in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Support groups
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

[1] Michael Brooks, Why doctors’ mental health should be a concern for us all, NewStatesmen, April 11, 2016, http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2016/04/why-doctors-mental-health-should-be-concern-us-all

[2] What are Anxiety Disorders?, Global Medical Education, https://www.gmeded.com/gme-info-graphics/what-are-anxiety-disorders

[3] Chronic Pain, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, April, 2016, https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain

[4] Global Medical Education, Supra.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection

[6] Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, Chronic pain sufferers likely to have anxiety, ScienceDaily, May 8, 2013, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130508213112.htm

[7] Definitions according to National Institute of Mental Health: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml


Share

I used to practice __________ but now I’m _____________?

 

You spent years in school and invested countless hours to establish and maintain your practice.  You even protected this investment by purchasing a disability policy.  Yet, if you do become disabled and make a claim, your insurer might still make the argument that you are only trying to retire and get paid for it.  Unfortunately, disability insurance claims by doctors and other healthcare professionals are especially targeted for denial or termination.

When you are disabled and are no longer able to practice in your profession, it may seem logical to simply refer to yourself as “retired,” especially if you are not working in another capacity.  While it’s certainly understandable that you may not want to explain to everyone who asks why you’ve hung up your lab coat, you need to keep in mind that innocently referring to yourself as retired will likely prompt your insurer to subject your claim to higher scrutiny.  Insurance companies often attempt to take statements out of context in order to deny or terminate benefits by alleging that a legitimately disabled claimant is:

  • Malingering
  • Making a lifestyle choice.
  • Unmotivated by or unsatisfied with work.
  • Embracing the sick role.

Remember, in the insurance company’s mind, there is a big difference between “disabled” and “retired.” Below are some common situations where you should avoid referring to yourself as retired:

  • When asked for your profession on claim forms.
  • When talking to your doctors or filling out medical paperwork.
  • On your taxes, other financial forms, and applications.
  • Around the office.
  • At social functions or gatherings.
  • On social media.

Insurers can—and often do—employ private investigators to follow claimants on social media; interview staff, family, or acquaintances; and track down “paper trail” documents (such as professional license renewal forms, loan applications, etc.) to see if you have made any statements that could be construed as inconsistent with your disability claim.  Insurers also routinely request medical records and may even contact your doctor(s) directly regarding your disability.  So, for example, saying something off-hand or even jokingly, such as “I’m retired—I can stay out as late as I want now!” to your doctor, or at a social event like a block party, could lead to your insurer trying to deny your claim if they later spoke to your doctor or your neighbor.

While the focus of your claim should be on your condition and how it prevents you from working, insurance companies can latch on to innocent statements like this in an effort to deny legitimate claims. Eschewing the word “retirement” is a good and easy first step to help avoid unwanted and unwarranted scrutiny from insurers.


Share

Comitz | Beethe Attorney Ed Comitz Posts CE Course on Dentaltown

Ed Comitz’s Continuing Education course “Disability Insurance Roulette: Why is it So Hard to Collect on My Policy” is now available through Dentaltown.  This CE is an electronically delivered, self-instructional program and is designated for 2 hours of CE credit.  In this course, Ed discusses why it is so difficult for dentists to collect disability benefits and how to avoid the most common mistakes made by dentists when filing disability claims.  Ed also covers the key provisions to look for in disability insurance policies and provides an overview of the disability claims process.  Finally, the course discusses how disability insurance claims are investigated and administered, and identifies common strategies used by insurance companies to deny claims.

Information on how to register can be found here

 

For more information regarding what to look for in a policy, see this podcast interview where Ed Comitz discusses the importance of disability insurance with Dentaltown’s Howard Farran.


Share

Are Benefits Taxable?

 

The Answer Is: It Depends

Whether your disability benefit payments are taxable depends on what type of policy or plan you have and how your premiums are paid.  This post is not intended as tax advice—we’ve outlined some basic information below only.  You should always speak with a tax professional regarding your particular situation.

Individual Policies:  These are policies that you purchase yourself.  Generally speaking, if you pay the premiums with after-tax dollars, the benefits you receive are tax free.  However, if you pay with pre-tax dollars or deduct your premiums as a business expense, then your benefits will likely be subject to federal income taxation.

Group Policies: Group policies are those offered through associations such as the ADA or AMA.   These types of policies offer special terms, conditions, and rates to members and function much like individual policies, with similar tax consequences.  Generally speaking, if you pay the premiums (with after-tax dollars) then the benefits you receive are tax free.

Employer-Sponsored Policies: These types of policies can be less straightforward when it comes to taxes, as the payment of premiums can be structured several ways.  According to the IRS website:

  • If your employer pays the premium and does not include the cost of the premiums in your gross income, then benefits you receive will generally be fully taxable.
  • If the employer only offers a policy, but you pay the entire premium without taking a tax deduction, then the benefits you receive will generally be tax-free.
  • If both your employer and you pay the premiums then the tax liability will generally be split.

If you are unsure what type of policy or plan you have, and you think your employer might be paying the premiums, you can look at your application (there is typically a portion that states who is responsible for the premiums) or talk to your HR department.  For more information, talk to your accountant.  You can also go to to the IRS website on disability insurance proceeds to find additional information.

It may be tempting to save money by enrolling only in a plan solely paid for by your employer, paying premiums with pre-tax dollars, or deducting premiums as business expenses.  But keep in mind that, if you do become disabled, the amount of your benefits actually available to you will substantially decrease if you are required to pay income tax on them.

Selecting a policy is an important decision, and how benefits will be taxed is a significant factor to consider. With statistics showing that one in four dentists will be disabled long enough to collect benefits at some point in their careers, choosing to save now could hurt you financially down the road.


Share

Chronic Pain and Depression

Chronic pain is often difficult to diagnose and treat.  Consequently, those who suffer from chronic pain typically must also deal with a significant amount of stress, due to repeated failed treatments, numerous medical appointments, interruption of work and enjoyable activities, and the inability of their friends or family to understand their physical limitations.  This can, in turn, cause or worsen depression.  When depression occurs alongside chronic pain, it can make dealing with and treating the pain even harder.

Chronic Pain Disorders Associated with the Co-Occurrence of Depression

While mental health conditions, including depression, can often be disabling in and of themselves, they are unfortunately also quite common in those suffering from chronic pain.  Depression is more likely to co-occur with certain conditions, such as:

  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Joint Pain
  • Arthritis
  • Migraines
  • Fibromyalgia

Studies show that rates of depression are high in residents and medical students (15%-30%) than rates in the general population, and the risk of depression continues throughout a physician’s career.[1]  According to a British study, 60% of dentists reported being anxious, tense, or depressed.

Dentists, doctors, and other medical professionals place extreme amounts of pressure on themselves because the stakes of their professions are so high.  In addition to perfectionism and self-criticism, other predictors of depression in doctors include:  lack of sleep, stressful interactions with patients and staff, dealing with death, constant responsibility, loneliness, and making mistakes.[2]

Often practitioners work through both chronic pain and psychiatric disorders for some time before acknowledging their disability or seeking adequate treatment.  In the case of depression, this can be due in part to the social stigma that surrounds it.  For all of these reasons, depression may go undiagnosed or seem less of an immediate concern to those suffering from chronic pain.  However, if you are experiencing symptoms of depression and chronic pain, studies show that it is important to treat both, because chronic pain can become much more difficulty to treat if the depression is allowed to progress unchecked.

Chronic Pain and Depression—Worse Together

Facing a long-term or permanent disability can trigger depression—this is especially understandable for doctors or dentists who have put years into medical school and establishing their careers, only to become disabled and have to step away from a profession that has become a significant part of their identity. Depression can also precede chronic pain.  For example, several studies have examined the link between depression before the onset of back-pain.[3]

Regardless of which came first, together they are formidable to treat.  Major depression is thought to be four times greater in people with chronic back pain than those in the general population, and studies show that individuals suffering from both chronic back pain and depression experienced a greater degree of impairment than those with either depression or back pain alone.[4]

Treatments for Depression

Focusing solely on pain management can prevent both the patient’s and treating physician’s ability to recognize that a psychiatric disorder is also present.  Yet, even with correct diagnoses, both issues can be difficult to treat together.[5]  For instance, those who suffer from both chronic pain and mental illnesses can have a lower pain threshold as well as increased sensitivity to medication side-effects.[6]  Some treatments that have proved successful in addressing depression in those with chronic pain include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Psychodynamic therapy (talk therapy)
  • Relaxation or meditation training
  • Acupuncture
  • Hypnosis
  • Exercise
  • Medication

Symptoms of Depression

  • Little interest or pleasure in doing things
  • Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless
  • Trouble falling asleep or sleeping too much
  • Feeling tired or having little energy
  • Poor appetite or overeating
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Feeling bad about yourself, or that you are a failure or have let yourself or others down
  • Thoughts that you would be better off dead, or hurting yourself in some way

Chronic pain sufferers who recognize any of the above-referenced symptoms in themselves should talk to their doctor to address these serious issues.

_________________________________________________________________________

[1] Robert P. Bright, MD, Depression and suicide among physicians, Current Psychiatry, April 10, 2011.

[2] Id.

[3] William W. Deardorff, PHD, ABPP, Depression Can Lead to Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-can-lead-chronic-back-pain.

[4] William W. Deardorff, PhD, ABPP, Depression and Chronic Back Pain, Spine-health.com, Oct. 15, 2004, http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/depression/depression-and-chronic-back-pain.

[5] Celeste Robb-Nicholson, M.D., The pain-anxiety-depression connection, Harvard Health Publications, http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-pain-anxiety-depression-connection.

[6] Anxiety and Depression Association of America, Chronic Pain,  https://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/other-related-conditions/chronic-pain.


Share

Watch Out for “Work” Provisions

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of how your policy defines the key term “total disability,” and provides several examples of “total disability” definitions.  The definition of “total disability” in your policy can be good, bad, or somewhere in-between when it comes to collecting your benefits.

Policies with “true own occupation” provisions are ideal.  Here’s an example of a “true own occupation” provision:

Under this type of provision, you are “totally disabled” if you can’t work in your occupation (for example, you can no longer perform dentistry).  This means that you can still work in a different field and receive your benefits under this type of policy.

Insurance companies often try to make other policies look like true own occupation policies, and include phrases like “own occupation” or “your occupation,” but then tack on additional qualifiers to create more restrictive policies.

One common example of a restriction you should watch out for is a “no work” provision.  Although these provisions can contain the phrase “your occupation” they only pay total disability benefits if you are not working in any occupation.  Here’s an example from an actual policy:

As you can see, under this type of provision, you cannot work in another field and still receive benefits.  This can be problematic if you do not have sufficient disability coverage to meet all of your monthly expenses, as you’re not able to work to supplement your income.

A “no work” provision is something that is relatively easy to recognize and catch, if you read your policy carefully.  Recently, we have come across a definition of “total disability” that is not so easy to spot, but can dramatically impact you ability to collect benefits.  Here’s an example, taken from a 2015 MassMutual policy:

At first glance, this looks like a standard “own-occupation” provision—in fact, it is entitled “Own Occupation Rider.”  But if you take the time to read it more closely, you’ll notice that the second bullet point requires you to be working in another occupation in order to receive “total disability” benefits.

Obviously, this is not a policy you want.  If you have a severely disabling condition, it may prevent you from working in any occupation, placing you in the unfortunate position of being unable to collect your benefits, even though you are clearly disabled and unable to work in any capacity.  Additionally, many professionals have limited training or work history outside their profession, so it can be difficult for them to find alternative employment or transition into another field—particularly later in life.

These “work” provisions appear to be a relatively new phenomenon, and are becoming increasingly more common in the newer policies being issued by insurance companies.  It is crucial that you watch out for these “work” provisions and make sure to read both the policies definition of “own-occupation” and “total disability.”  While many plans contain the phrase “own-occupation”, including this example, they often aren’t true own-occupation policies and you shouldn’t rely on an insurance agent to disclose this information.  Oftentimes, your agent may not even realize all of the ramifications of the language and definitions in the policy that they are selling to you.

Lastly, you’ll also note that this particular provision was not included in the standard “definitions” section of the policy, but was instead attached to the policy as a “rider,” making it even harder to spot.  It’s important to remember that many definitions and provisions that limit coverage are contained in riders, which typically appear at the end of your policy.  Remember, you should read any policy from start to finish before purchasing.


Share

Protecting Your Retirement Income – Part 3

Retirement Protection Insurance

In our last two posts we discussed two different disability insurance policy riders that may help mitigate the problems that a disabling condition can create for your retirement planning. A graded lifetime benefits rider and a lump sum benefit rider offer two alternative solutions to the same problem, with one providing a reliable, steady income stream and the other providing a greater degree of financial flexibility. If neither of those options are particularly appealing, some disability insurance companies have created another product that, unlike lifetime benefits or a lump sum, is specifically tailored toward the retirement planning challenges posed by a total and permanent disability.

What Is Retirement Protection Insurance?

Retirement protection insurance was created by some insurers precisely to deal with these concerns. Depending on the insurer, this product may be offered as a standalone policy or as a rider to your existing disability insurance policy. The idea behind retirement protection insurance is to create an investment product that functions similarly to the qualified 401(k) you contribute to in your current occupation, allowing you to take advantage of both the market returns and employer contributions that you currently enjoy.

How does this work? If you become totally disabled and your claim is approved, your insurer will establish a trust for your benefit. Each month, benefits are deposited into the trust and invested in index funds and other investment portfolios similar to the options you have with your employer-sponsored 401(k). This product can cover up to 100% of your retirement contributions and 100% of employer contributions at a maximum of $50,000 per year. Under the terms of the trust, you will be able to access these funds after age 65.

Potential Problems

At first glance, this product appears to solve the problems that a disability can create for retirement savings. Specifically, it appears tailor made as a substitute for your employer-sponsored 401(k), which you can no longer contribute to once you stop working due to a disability. However, there are some issues with this particular product that you will want to clarify with your insurer before purchasing it as a rider or as a standalone policy.

First, some insurers are using a different definition of disability for this product than for your standard individual disability insurance policy. In many cases, the definition of total disability for this specific product is narrower and more stringent (i.e. you must be unable to perform work in any occupation) than the specialty-specific own-occupation definition in most disability insurance policies purchased by doctors and dentists.

For example, assume you have an own occupation policy with this rider and due to your medical condition you are unable to perform your duties as an orthopedic surgeon. For three years you collect monthly benefits through your policy and also enjoy three years’ worth of contributions to the trust account established for your benefit by your insurer. After three years, you go back to work as a primary care physician. Because you are still disabled under the terms of your own occupation policy, you continue receiving monthly benefits. However, the retirement contributions to your trust cease because the definition of total disability is “any occupation.” Under this scenario, even though you are totally disabled for the purposes of your policy, you are no longer receiving the benefit of the rider you paid good money for because it measures your disability by a different standard.

Second, because the investment account is held in trust, somebody has to manage it. As a result, there may be fees associated with both the management of the trust and the investment account. Also, 401(k) accounts receive special tax treatment – as long as the money stays in your account it is allowed to grow tax-free without any capital gains tax levied against your investment returns. It may very well be that any investment account held in trust by your insurer through this insurance product will be fully taxed.

Before you purchase retirement protection insurance either as a rider or as a standalone policy, you will want to clarify the issues addressed above. Make sure you fully understand the terms (including the definition of total disability), the fees, and the tax implications of this product before you purchase it. Though initially it may look like an attractive option, the costs may outweigh the benefits, and other options to protect your retirement income may be a better solution for your particular circumstances and objectives.


Share